What is your number ONE rule in the classroom and why? If you could summarize all your expectations for optimum learning in your classroom, what would it be and why?

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The number one rule I have learned during a 33 plus-year career is being consistent. Make the students aware of your expectations and follow through with class procedures in a predictable manner. There should not be different rules for different students. A contract is important, class rules should be posted...

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The number one rule I have learned during a 33 plus-year career is being consistent. Make the students aware of your expectations and follow through with class procedures in a predictable manner. There should not be different rules for different students. A contract is important, class rules should be posted and rubrics are used to keep the grading procedure very transparent. There should be clear expectations of learning, behavior, respect and participation to remove the guess work from students. Most young people crave a routine that is not subject to change. If you expect the students to respect themselves, and their peers along with the teacher, you must model these behaviors. Good luck!

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Response #158 is more or less what I do in my class. One of the better ways of making things work in a class is to help instill the idea of us, students and teacher - being conscious about how our actions affect other people in the class. In the beginning of the school year, my class brainstorms on positive and negative ideas and actions that we percieve can make us all productive or unproductive and discuss how these ideas and actions affect individual students and the class as a whole. From here, we create our class rules focusing on individual responsibility and accountability. As a rule, the class should be aware at all times that we share the same space with other individuals and that to keep harmony in that space, we should ask ourselves, "how does my words and actions affect the person next to me?" Social awareness creates a caring and respectful person in the classroom and beyond.

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What is your number ONE rule in the classroom and why?

If you could summarize all your expectations for optimum learning in your classroom, what would it be and why?

RESPECT. I tell my students that respect is the first and only rule of my classroom. To respect themselves, the other people in the classroom and the room itself. I tell them to try their best and never let anyone else put them down, this shows respect for themselves. They all know how to respect others, they just have to choose to. Lastly our classroom is our home away from home, why not make it clean, safe and comfortable?

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My number one rule is for me, not for my students.  I remind myself daily that I need to respect my students.  I strongly believe that if I treat my students with respect, they will respect me and the classroom will be a peaceful place.

I teach my students to respect each other, but there are no actual rules in my classroom.  I don’t have any posted on the wall, and I don’t review them on the first day of school.  Instead, I have procedures that I expect my students to remember and I am careful to get to know them and treat them with respect.

I always ask myself, is this something that I would do or say to an adult?  If I cannot pass that test, I should not do or say this to a child in my class.

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What is your number ONE rule in the classroom and why?

If you could summarize all your expectations for optimum learning in your classroom, what would it be and why?

Respect!  Students must demonstrate respect for one another.  This does not mean liking each other necessarily but rather realizing that everyone has a right to an education that is not inhibited by others.  Also that everyone has different opinions and each are to be respected even if they differ from your own opinion.  Finally, I also tell students that they must respect themselves.  Usually when students do not complete an assignment it is because they couldn't not because they didn't want to.  If they respect themselves and their education then they will advocate for themselves and seek help for the answers as opposed to simply just letting the learning pass them by.

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My number one rule in the classroom is that the kids must "think." Everything that they do must come from their minds and what they think about the books we're reading, the conversations we're having and the writing we're doing. I make it extremely clear at the beginning of the year that what they think matters in my classroom and that they have to be able to express what they think in order for the class to move forward.

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My number one rule in my class is respect. I make sure that my students respect their fellow classmates and their teacher. The class atmosphere goes uncontrollable when the students do not respect each other. Students listen patiently when others are speaking and never mock at their opinions. I think when students show respect, they start to truly enjoy their classes.

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I have one for my students and one for myself (I teach inner city high school)...

For my students: "Don't be a distraction to your peers' learning," as it can be very difficult to get my students focused (particularly when I teach freshmen) and too many students do not see the value of education and therefore the need to respect the educational setting (until they leave my class!).

For myself: "Employ my sense of humor - often." This means not only use it in the classroom (my sarcasm has grown exponentially in the years I have been teaching!) to redirect off task behaviors and engage students in learning, but also to laugh at all of the unbelievable things that actually go on in the educational system (if we don't laugh we may cry, right?).

 

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What is your number ONE rule in the classroom and why?

If you could summarize all your expectations for optimum learning in your classroom, what would it be and why?

 At the beginning of the year, I give my students a firm "I/We will not stand for" statement.  We agree, as a class, that we will not stand for the belittling, hatred, or picking on of any person in our class because of their race, gender, class, sexual orientation, hair color, freckle location, or differing ear sizes.  We talk about those things that make us unique and how lucky we are to learn together and from each other.  That is the firmest I am all year and they don't push it for the rest of the year.

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I am not sure that most educators have a number one rule, per se. I think the reality might be that we have a specific rule that we focus on, but that it changes over time. For example, many teachers will start with "treat others with respect" or "be polite" at the start of their career. This isn't surprising because I think an inexperienced teacher is likely to focus on management. However, as teachers gain experience, I think we start to take things like "respect" as a given. After, I think many teachers will reveal their individuality as they focus on things like "strive for excellence," "humor is a vital part of any learning community," or "curiosity is at the heart of learning." I've dodged your question, though hopefully you'll understand why.

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What is your number ONE rule in the classroom and why?

If you could summarize all your expectations for optimum learning in your classroom, what would it be and why?

 One word:  RESPECT.  As long as you respect me as a teacher (which by the way does not mean I'm you equal--I have graduated with a college degree in my subject, many of us also hold masters, and also I hold a job--most teens haven't yet), I will respect as a youth on his/her scholastic journey toward adulthood.  Once one of us has broken this rule (and to be perfectly honest, sometimes it's been me) behavior will change between us.  For me, it may involve me apologizing to an individual (or even the whole class) that I have done wrong.  For a student that has not shown me or a fellow student respect means that I will alter my behavior towards them as is appropriate.  My room is not a democracy but a benevolent dictatorship.  I must not shirk  my responsibility to provide a student an education, but it doesn't mean I have to like them either.  I do not have to go out of my way to be nice, to remind them of due dates, to extend due dates, to give extra credit, to bounce them up to the next highest grade.  In other words, I must always be professional in my interactions, but I don't need to be nice to them.

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My number one rule in the classroom is that Everyone must be able to hear what I say! Every member of the class has the same rights to access the education, information and insights that I provide and I do not tolerate being talked over, interrupted, distracted by attention-seeking students, or being  responded to rudely. Students who do these things are restricting the access of other students who want to learn and need to hear what I have to share with them.

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My number one rule is that my students remain 100% engaged in the lesson at all times. If they are 100% engaged, they will have no time for visiting, jesting, doing homework, sleeping, etc. My classes are taught Socratically, and it is impossible for students to follow the discussion if they are not actively listening and participating. I can't say that I always get complete compliance, but I get enough to demonstrate the efficacy of the rule.

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Be consistent. If you say you are going to do something, you must follow through. Students expect discipline and consequences. They expect the same outcome to rules and not inconsistency. You must be strict but at the same time, be fair. That has served me well throughout my almost 29 years of teaching.

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Respect for the instructor and for other students is paramount. Of course this translates to many behaviors. Lack of respect for others is what tends to be behind poor classroom behavior, including use of cell phones, side conversations during lectures, denigrating the opinions of others (whether verbally or non-verbally), leaving the room in the middle of a lecture, etc. If you don't have respect and decorum, it's hard for learning to happen. I find this kind of decorum has really slipped in recent years; kids are so much more entitled and selfish acting now.

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My most important rule is "the two Cs of communication" - clear and calm! I try and stress not only the importance of communicating clearly, both about our subject matter, and the students grades and expectations etc, to avoid dramas! The "calm" is kind of my version of respectful, as the students can normally easily judge what content I consider appropriate, but the "calm" rule helps them to remember to keep volume and attitude appropriate too.

Although... I have to admit that, as I teach ESL much of the time, Rule No. 1 on my wall is "Speak in English!"

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My number one rule in the classroom is to show respect to others whether you agree with them or not: it's all right to agree to disagree, and it takes nothing from you to do so; it is important, I tell them, for each student to enter my class and know that he or she can be safe from ridicule or censorship. It may be the only place they get such acceptance all day.

My reasoning is that our students will (we hope) eventually move out into society, and we want them not only to be able to survive, but to excel and be happy. However, that is only part of the picture. If we can teach our children to show tolerance and empathy, they can pass it on to others. Not everyone will appreciate their efforts, but how nice to change the world, one person at a time, rather than throwing up our hands and thinking it is impossible.

We plant the seed, never knowing if or when it will take root. However, I think living by example is a great way to teach as well. I'm not perfect with this, but I keep trying because I believe it's the right thing to do; but I also try because these kids don't miss anything. (If only they were that perceptive and motivated during "lesson time!")

As a PS, this is not a rule, but I try to make my kids laugh. It's so healthy, and I love it when they make me laugh. Sometimes they are so funny that the tears run down my face, and how they love that, too!

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My number one rule in the classroom is think before you speak. There is no rule that applies more universally to a classroom than this.

Before you answer a question, think.

Before you ask a question, think.

Before you ask to go to the bathroom, think.

Before you talk to your neighbor, think.

My close second favorite rule, though, is a quote from Shakespeare: "Everyone ought to bear patiently the results of his/her own conduct". There's nothing like this:
 "I can't believe you gave me a demerit!"

"Well, what did you do to deserve the demerit? Think about it."

"Oh yeah... Well..."

I think it's a big part of a teacher's duty to teach students not only the information in the lesson plans, but how to act in general.

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My number one rule was to Listen with respect.  Being an 8th grade teacher, I had to demonstrate the many faces used by students to silently express unacceptable ideas without using words.  They then understood that they could not make faces about students they were assigned to work with and use the old excuse, "But I never said anything!"  The rule also covered listening to me or to each other's responses or ideas as well as hearing each other in a discussion.  At the end of every unit, I asked the students to tell me what I had done well and what I had missed telling them which would have made the project easier to understand.  I found that listening to students with respect and implementing some of their ideas taught them that they had worthy ideas, that I needed to listen too, and that our classroom worked much better if we accepted each other and worked together.

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What is your number ONE rule in the classroom and why?

If you could summarize all your expectations for optimum learning in your classroom, what would it be and why?

 My number one expectation is respect for the teacher and respect for each other.  This is important in my classes because I believe if students are comfortable answering questions without fear of their classmates' reactions, the classroom is a more comfortable place.  I also think respect, in general, is important in life and students sometimes need to be reminded of this.

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I tell my students that the most important rule in my classroom is "edifying language only."   I have often been disappointed at my students for teasing, taunting or tearing each other down, and then trying to excuse their statements by saying "just kidding."  In my classroom, students are instructed to use language that will build up their classmates self-esteem.  My students know that if they need to say "just kidding," then what they want to say is inappropriate.

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I learned my Number One rule from a principal, which is not my usual source for inspiration.

The rule states: The one who is doing the most work is the one who is learning the most.

And that person is THE STUDENT.  Yes, I work hard to prepare, to manage, to assist, to instruct, etc.  But my most important goal is to motivate the students to get off their proverbial hind legs and GET BUSY with something, anything, constructive.

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My number one rule is that WE LEARN TOGETHER.

Working in cooperative learning groups promotes:

1. Positive social interactions - students learn to interact with one another in a positive, safe environment.

2. Respect for each other - students learn to respect each other because they need each other to complete the day's activities.

3. Responsibility - each member is responsible for a part of the work completed.

4. Accountability - my students hold each other accountable for completing work, managing time, staying on task, cleaning up supplies, etc.

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I keep my rules simple and yet they do cover most issues.  They are "Do what you are supposed to be doing and be where you are supposed to be."  This covers a ton of issues, for example, we should be working on vocabulary, and yet a student is instead texting.  I can now write them up as they are violating my rules.  One of our problems at our school are "hall wanderers" so my second rule addresses that.  If you asked to go to the restroom, but are found in a computer lab, I can now refer you to the office because you were not where you were supposed to be. 

I find that most students understand my rules regardless of how vague they may appear.  I can also defeat arguments by simply asking, "Were you doing what you were supposed to be doing?" and if the answer is not yes, but instead a string of excuses, I repeat the question until they finally admit that "No, I was not."  It becomes quite simple at that point.  Rule violated, and how they can come back into line.  Do what you are supposed to be doing.

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I have but three written rules in my classroom: be respectful, be responsible, and be involved. As an activity early in the school year, I have my high school students brainstorm lists of examples and non-examples of each of these rules. In effect, they are the ones who delineate the details of what precisely these rules mean.

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What is your number ONE rule in the classroom and why?

If you could summarize all your expectations for optimum learning in your classroom, what would it be and why?

Have RESPECT!!!! I have found that everything good stems from a mutual respect. I have respect for my students and show this to them by being fair and choosing literature/activities that suit their interests. The students demonstrate respect by simply doing what I ask....homework is turned in, discussions are lively AND tolerant of all viewpoints. It is the one thing I stress on a daily basis.

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Lots of teachers and administrators have different pet peeves in the classroom--students not paying attention, talking on the phone, passing notes, sleeping, coming in late, not participating, etc.

Of course I want all of my students to be actively involved in every lesson, but come on, I'm human, they're human, none of us are going to be all the way "on" at all times, for every lesson.

Also, different students have different learning styles, I will never be able to connect with some of my students no matter how hard I try because I can not effectively teach every single learning style.

So, I pretty much allow anything in my classroom as long as it does not distrupt the lesson for me or for those students in the classroom who are involved and can get something out of the lesson.

So, do whatever you do, but do it silently and without drama.

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My number one rule in my classroom is everyone contributes to the learning process. I have learned that instead of  the "chalk and talk" traditional method of teaching, it is more effective if students interact amongst themselves and with the teacher,  to arrive at a conclusion to a problem. Part of being able to internalize a concept, is to feel you have actively solved the problem the teacher presents that day in class. Instead of simply copying notes, actively learning something will enable the student to process the concept and remember it in a more meaningful way. Therefore, everyone is responsible for learning in my classroom and this learning can be gauged by immediate feedback using writing, drawing or presenting as a "window" into my students' thought processes.

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I require that students respect themselves, each other, and me--at all times.  To me, this is the most important rule an educator can have, as so much depends on the mutual presence of respect.  I teach high school, and I find that when students respect their teacher and each other, they are more willing to learn, discuss, debate, and have fun in class.  Students want to please a teacher whom they respect, and I think that having high school students want to please their teachers and work hard to make them proud is one of the most rewarding parts of the job. 

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I have so many rules...this is difficult.

While noble and important, humor can go terribly wrong and respect is impossible to gauge.

The most important rule to follow as a teacher is to LOVE your subject.  Anyone entering a classroom can discern immediately if the instructor is simply going through the motions or that they honestly feel that the material they are responsible for sharing is significant.

Love it or leave it.

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The most important rule to me is to enter my classroom with an empty cup, and an open mind.  You cannot teach a person who believes they already have the answers, and you cannot share your perspective with someone who has already decided what is right.  I believe that humility is one of the most important qualities that a teacher can possess.  I expect no more from my students than I expect from myself, and as such, I learn as much from my students as they learn from me.

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"Offer respect with an open mind."

Obviously, respect for classmates and ideas is #1, but with that students must be willing to break from their comfort zones and explore what the subject matter (in my case, literature) has to offer. I feel that no learning can take place unless preconceived notions are challenged. And what better way to grow than by revisiting your own assumptions and beliefs, while considering others?

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My number one rule in the classroom is Fairness. All students are treated equally and fairly; there are no "favorites." All grading is based on a clearly defined mathematical rubric. All students are held to the same standards for both academic achievement and behavior. When all things are fair, you earn the respect of your students which thus creates a smooth and effective working environment.

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My number one rule in my classroom starts with myself, and trickles down to my students.  That rule is Consistency.  If I am consistent with my students:  with what I tell them to do, with what I expect from them academically and behaviorally, then they in turn become consistent with what they give me and how they live up to my expectations.

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My number-one rule is that everyone comes to class prepared to work. That means that they should have their textbook, paper, and something to write with. Yet I still have kids ask me, "Do we need our books today?" My answer is always, "When do you not need your books?"

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I think that establishing a climate of scholarship from the opening moments of interaction is critical.  I try to set up that everything we do in the classrom is in pursuit of scholarship.  This is how we function and operate and all that is done has to be in its name.  This would be why horseplay and disruptiveness is unacceptable, for it takes away from scholarship and the ends to which one can proceed to it.  I think that being able to stress this throughout the year is what helps out a great deal in establishing the climate of learning in the classroom setting.

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RESPECT YOUR CLASSMATES.

In a discussion course that features student facilitation as well as presentations, students will not feel comfortable in making comments or taking important intellectual risks unless they feel safe.  If students are ever allowed to laugh at their classmates earnest efforts or in any way belittle the work that their classmates' produce, the environment will become toxic and there will be no genuine discussion based on serious, creative student consideration.

I tell my students that there is really only one way to make me mad: to disrespect their classmates in any way.  I have a reputation for being very calm and hard to rattle or upset.  I may go for years without yelling or raising my voice much at all.  However, my students have heard stories about times when I have become upset, and all of those student legends about me relate directly to the fact that I will not tolerate students who disrespect their classmates during discussions or presentations.

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Mine is 'treat others the way you would wish to be treated'. I  explore this idea in the first lesson with each class, and we negotiate the code for our classroom from this. The ideas of not talking when others are talking, hands and feet to yourself, respecting and responding positively, etc. come from this one idea. Teachers need to be included the rules that foster good behaviour and a positive learning environment.  

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Don't cause a problem for yourself or anyone else.  I got this from "Love and Logic", and it works pretty well.  Most of the rules I see posted in other teacher's rooms fall under the umbrella of this one.  When students are doing something they shouldn't, we discuss why it is causing a problem and how they can fix it.

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Be on time.  It may just be a pet peeve of mine, but when students come late, besides showing disrespect to me and everyone else in the class also interrupts whatever we're doing, and I like to teach bell to bell.  My students learn quickly it's one of the few ways to get me angry.

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You can make rules as a teacher, but in order to get the students to follow them, you have to show them respect as individuals and demand that same respect in return.I don't think that attitude works if you state it as a rule; you must embody the example and make it clear that you will accept no less from your students than what you give to them. That being said, my #1 rule is: have fun. That goes for both me and my students. If we are not having fun, we are not doing it right, and it applies across the board, whatever subject I happen to be engaged in teaching at the time. My teaching philosophy can be summed up by Dr. Seuss: "It's fun to have fun, but you have to know how." Having fun is NEVER at anyone's expense.

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What is your number ONE rule in the classroom and why?

If you could summarize all your expectations for optimum learning in your classroom, what would it be and why?

  Optimum learning occurs in a relaxed, friendly atmosphere.  Once I give the lesson and assign the work, I allow them to visit and interact with each other, help each other, and otherwise just watch.  I like to pair them up in teams and let them "hash" it out.  They raise their hands if they need help and I move around the room assisting anyone who needs it.  Many times I'll play soft music in the background.  They love it and we get a lot accomplished in a short time! 

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What is your number ONE rule in the classroom and why?

If you could summarize all your expectations for optimum learning in your classroom, what would it be and why?

  My #1 rule is DON'T TALK WHEN THE TEACHER IS TALKING!  The reason I stress this is I'm there to teach and they can't learn if they don't pay attention to me when I'm talking.  So, from day one they learn to not interrupt and to stop whatever they're doing as soon as I start talking.  At the same time, if they have something to say I respect their time and don't interrupt them. 

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My number one rule is no talking while the teacher is talking. It's tough for other kids who want a true learning experience when other conversations are going on around you, and it's a show of respect for the teacher as head of the classroom.

Absolutely right!  If the students talk while the teacher instructs, they will try other things, too, such as leaving their seats, etc. and the classroom will be chaos.

Insisting on quiet when instruction is given also conditions students for listening when their classmates contribute to discussion or raise relevant questions.

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My number one rule is no talking while the teacher is talking. It's tough for other kids who want a true learning experience when other conversations are going on around you, and it's a show of respect for the teacher as head of the classroom.

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No laughing at other people's ideas.  I love humor, I love to laugh, and my classes tend to be (I hope) pretty fun.  But I will not tolerate people laughing at other people's ideas.  That is the quickest way in my opinion to stifle someone's willingness to participate and to be intellectually creative.

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I tend to follow a cheesy little thing we called "ABC's" when I worked at a wilderness camp for at-risk youth - All Around Basic Cleanliness.  This was the idea that everything needs to be in order, from the classroom to the students.  In my public school we had a standard mode of dress - which I enforced to a Nazi degree.  My classroom is always organized and tidy - as are my lessons - planned and ready to go.  When every controllable factor is "clean" - the uncontrollable ones (kids' behavior) are easier to spot early.  I also fight the small battles small - and I rarely have to deal with big battles.

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Respect is #1, and it goes both ways. If I don't have respect for my students, they will know it, and all situations deteriorate. If respect is present, most other rules are unnecessary; students who feel respected, show respect, and that translates into being on time, doing homework, etc.

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This is going to make me sound like a control freak but to me in my experience the most important thing is that the students know that I as the teacher am in control - not them. Everything seems to flow from this. If they know who is boss then they can have a great learning experience. Of course, this needs to be reinforced (constantly with some classes) but it really guarantees a productive learning environment.

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I respect my students first of all. I find that when the students are treated with respect then they will naturally respect you. This helps a great deal with classroom management. I also require my students to treat everyone else with respect as well.

I agree with the post that stated they keep a sense of humor in the classroom. I think this is very important (and healthy) as well.

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I have two rules that are a must:  always do your best and always treat others with respect.  If they follow these two rules, everything else falls into place.  Doing your best includes being prepared, being on time to class, and turning in homework students are proud to put their names on...which translates to good grades and great class discussions.  Respecting others creates a classroom atmosphere where there is no fear of risk.  Which helps with rule number 1, and helps us all tolerate the off days when we have them.

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Have a sense of humor--this is a rule for me and my students.  I teach high school juniors and seniors, and it is imperative that I can laugh at myself and that my students can do so too.  This is not to say that my classroom is full of raucous laughter, but it creates an environment where students are not afraid to make mistakes and where I'm not afraid to admit that I don't know all the answers to life's problems.

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