Can "I, Too" by Langston Hughes be said to connect to the American Dream or simply just American life?

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Because of the second line of the poem, "I am the darker brother," I think the message of this poem most closely and specifically relates to the dream of racial equality, rather than the American dream (which seems to me to be more financial in nature, addressing a way to...

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Because of the second line of the poem, "I am the darker brother," I think the message of this poem most closely and specifically relates to the dream of racial equality, rather than the American dream (which seems to me to be more financial in nature, addressing a way to circumvent class privilege, rather than addressing the issue of racial privilege or lack thereof). The speaker declares that he is "beautiful" and that, "Tomorrow" (a metonymy for the future), white America will see and understand his beauty. He seems to be referring to appearance rather than to something else. During the mid-twentieth century, most of white America certainly did not see blackness as beautiful, though the speaker obviously believes that it is only a matter of time before this will change.

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I actually think that both views are valid in regard to this poem. If we have a careful look at the poem, we can see that there is definitely a dream of equality and success in the second stanza, when the speaker, having described how he is separated from others in the first stanza, dreams about a "tomorrow" when he will not be excluded and shut away:

Tomorrow,
I'll be at the table
When company comes.
Nobody'll dare
Say to me,
"Eat in the kitchen,"
Then.

This offers a hopeful dream of the equality and success that can be related to the American dream. However, principally, I think this poem relates to American life and the racism that it featured and authors such as Hughes challenged and raged against. Note the way the poem ends with a clear declaration of how the speaker should have the same rights to sit at the same table as whites:

I, too, am America.

He is demanding that his own status as being part of America is recognised and acknowledged, not just conveniently ignored as he has been shut away from the others in the kitchen. Thus the poem sees to say more about American society at the time of writing, although we can clearly link it in to the American Dream.

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