What is your feminist criticism to the short story "Jane Austen and the Mistletoe Kiss" by Jo Beverly?Hi...I would love to ask anyone to please tell me one thing. This is a new short...

What is your feminist criticism to the short story "Jane Austen and the Mistletoe Kiss" by Jo Beverly?

Hi...

I would love to ask anyone to please tell me one thing. This is a new short story by Jo Beverly. I read it and loved it, and I wanted to find anyone's opinion about it in a faminst way or look....

Expert Answers
kimberlee154 eNotes educator| Certified Educator

I loved the story. Reading it in a feminist way, Elinor is a proud, determined widow who is struggling to raise her daughters without depending on a man. She is a "realist" who wants to be independent, but at the same time, knows that she lives in the "age of man." She resents Sir Danvers charity; she says he is "[t]oo kind at times", but she still wants the best for her daughters and so is thrilled at the prospect of a union between Amy and Sir Danvers. This would legitimize the care of her daughters so as not to be charity.

When it comes to love, Elinor also believes herself a "realist", not wanting herself nor her daughters to be hurt by something she believes is fleeting and transient. She says, "Love? That wasn't how the world worked." She wants to stand tall and straight against the frenzy and whims of love and believes a union for a more practical reason is better and safer than an emotional one. Like Austen's characters, she is a strong woman who is surprised by her susceptibility to love.