Pride and Prejudice Questions and Answers
by Jane Austen

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what is your favorite part of the book "Pride and Prejudice"? what is your favorite part of the book "Pride and Prejudice"?

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lmetcalf eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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I love the Netherfield Ball in chapter 18.  Here, Elizabeth gets her chance to come back at Darcy for his treatment of her at the first ball.  She has the upper hand in terms of their conversation -- it is like she is ready for him this time now that she knows him better.  I also enjoy all those moments when I want to just shout "AWKWARD!"  Examples: Lydia's piano playing; Mrs. Bennet's overstatements about the impending marriage of Jane and Bingley; Collins' introduction of himself to Darcy.  All so much fun! 

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linda-allen eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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I love the scene in which Lady Catherine visits the Bennets and asks Elizabeth to walk with her in the "prettyish wilderness" on the side of their house. She just couldn't call it a garden! I love the way Elizabeth stands up to her and puts her in her place--something that has probably never happened before.

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Karen P.L. Hardison eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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My favorite part of Pride and Prejudice are absolutely the scenes where Mr. Darcy gives his ill-judge proposal and on the road in front of Rosings forrest where Elizabeth is reading Mr. Darcy's letter. The scenes when they get to Pemberley and Elizabeth learns the terible news are second best. and who doesn't like the balls. I think the genius of Jane Austen's work has never yet been realized in film adaptations.

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readinator eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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There are so many wonderful moments in Pride and Prejudice that it's hard to limit it to one "part."  I think the most compelling scene for me as a teacher is the moment when Elizabeth is visiting with her aunt and uncle at Pemberley on their tour in chapter 43.  She stands at the window and looks out on the grounds and says:

"Elizabeth . . .  went to a window to enjoy its prospect. The hill, crowned with wood, from which they had descended, receiving increased abruptness from the distance, was a beautiful object. Every disposition of the ground was good; and she looked on the whole scene -- the river, the trees scattered on its banks, and the winding of the valley, as far as she could trace it -- with delight."

Although this is an odd choice for a favorite passage, I think what Elizabeth is reflecting on is not Pemberley at all, but Darcy.  He's "beautiful" with a "disposition" that was "good."  Everything she now knows about him she sees "with delight."  What a change of heart!  Austen is so subtle here---making Pemberley stand for the man.  It's clear that Elizabeth has changed her mind about Darcy, and Austen makes it clear to us that she has  through this description.  I think Elizabeth is looking at the "prospect" of Darcy in a new light.  She is indeed seeing things with new perspective out a clearer window.  Clever Austen.  Beautiful change of heart. 

 

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lchunt | Student

My favorite part of Pride and Prejudice is when Elizabeth is visiting Pemberley with her aunt and uncle and unexpectedly meets Mr. Darcy.  I love the changes you see in the Elizabeth and Darcy and the contrast that this meeting has with their last meeting in Rosings.  You can sympathize with Elizabeth's embarrassment upon running into Darcy, but his kindness towards her and her family diffuses her embarrassment and leaves the reader with a new admiration for Darcy.