What would you consider the top 10 most important scenes in "A Tale of Two Cities"?I am trying to make a soundtrack for the book for an english project, and am having trouble narrowing down my...

What would you consider the top 10 most important scenes in "A Tale of Two Cities"?

I am trying to make a soundtrack for the book for an english project, and am having trouble narrowing down my 'important scenes' to 10.

Asked on by skahbana

1 Answer | Add Yours

dkalloch's profile pic

dkalloch | College Teacher | (Level 1) eNoter

Posted on

Here are ten very important scenes of the book:

Book I - Chapter 5 - The Wine Shop, here we meet Madame Defarge, seemingly innocent enough shop and people.  Yet as a great foreshadowing chapter, we shall see how the character portrayal will come to show us by the end of the book what her true character is.

Book I - Chapter 6 - The shoemaker, we meet the heroine of the book and the person she fights for.  It is important because we find out how strong her character is and what one of the subplots is about.

Book II - Chapter 8 when the Marquis arrives in his travelling carriage.  There is an abundance of animal imagery in this chapter.  The snake-like whip is cracked, the Marquis questions the peasant under the carriage "What man, pig?" And the conversation continues with more connotations of animal imagery. We know who this Marquis is, how important he is, what his name connotes, and what the significance of the scene is.  How he treats people who are beneath his station will foreshadow upcoming events.

Book II Chapter 12 - The Fellow of Delicacy. Mr. Stryver's character is excellently established here.  He is ironically a fellow of "no" delicacy.  He hopes to marry Lucie but instead is rejected.  His ego is hurt and he passes her off as an "mincing fool" but Mr. Lorry encourages him to calm down

Book II Chapter 14 - An Honest Tradesman. This is an excellent comparison of British peasant life to French peasant life at that time. Jerry Cruncher, the honest tradesman, goes fishing, after he sees a funeral pass by his home.  This is an excellent example of irony.  He goes "fishing" for the body in order to sell it to the local scientists for money.

Book II Chapter 21 - Echoing Footsteps. A good scene for "a calm before the storm" approach. Lucie is happy and has a child, little Lucie.  She still sits in her corner and listens to the footsteps as they pass by on the street.

Book III Chapter I - In Secret.  A great scene for what showing what can go wrong, always does go wrong. Charles travels through France in secret and is arrested and jailed.

Book III Chapter 6 - Triumph. At the tribunal, the doctor saves Charles's life and all is well! Because Dr. Manette is a hero, Charles is a hero as well.

Book III Chapter 8 - A Hand at Cards. In this scene, things begin to unravel.  Jerry Cruncher and Miss Pross meet up with her brother whom she hasn't seen in years.  Her brother does not wish to be recognized however because he is working undercover.  Unfortunately for him, when Mr. Carton appears and identifies him, he is forced to accompany them to Tellson's and help save Charles.

Book III Chapter 15 - The Footsteps Die Out Forever.  This chapter sums up the entire book quietly.  Eventhough the Revolutionary women enjoy the deaths of the people they prosecute, these people have died with dignity and for a greater purpose. 

We’ve answered 318,991 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question