What would the vesicle of a cell be if it were a part of the school?

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When comparing a cell and its organelles to a human organization, some analogies are fairly obvious. You've chosen a school, and comparisons such as mitochondria being like the furnaces burning fuel to warm the school are clear. Vesicles are more difficult due to the job they perform in the cell....

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When comparing a cell and its organelles to a human organization, some analogies are fairly obvious. You've chosen a school, and comparisons such as mitochondria being like the furnaces burning fuel to warm the school are clear. Vesicles are more difficult due to the job they perform in the cell. Vesicles take proteins and other molecules produced by the cell and move them either to other parts of the cell, or take them to the cell membrane. There, the membrane of the vesicle fuses with the cell membrane, opening to outside the cell and releasing the contents to the environment outside the cell.

You could make an argument for vesicles being like the large wheeled trashcans that take trash to the dumpsters outside. They are containers of items produced by the school, that serve to take them to outside of the walls. A more positive analogy might be that the graduates of the school are like vesicles--they are loaded with knowledge and skills provided by the school, and leave with that knowledge as a part of themselves.

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