In To Kill a Mockingbird, how does Atticus meet the criteria of Joseph Campbell's definition of a "hero's journey"?call,threshold,threshold guradians, helpers, mentor, challenges &...

In To Kill a Mockingbird, how does Atticus meet the criteria of Joseph Campbell's definition of a "hero's journey"?

call,threshold,threshold guradians, helpers, mentor, challenges & temptation,talisman,abyss, relevation & transformation, atonmet, return

 

Asked on by qaz123

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appletrees | College Teacher | (Level 2) Educator

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The best way to answer this question is to review the plot of the novel and try to match each of these aspects of the Hero's Journey with similar points in Atticus' journey. Although the steps go in a particular order, matching them to specific plot points in a fictional narrative may mean they occur slightly out of order.

One threshold guardian for Atticus is Scout: despite her own struggles to be a good person, her strength of will and inherent honesty, as well as her precocious maturity in many aspects of her personality, mean that she becomes an effective (if young) mentor to Atticus, perhaps reminding him of himself and his own strong-willed youth.

The hero's journey is ultimately a search for self; usually the hero ends up learning that he/she always had what they were seeking for at the outset of the journey, but were unable to realize it at the time.

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