What would be a good thesis statement for an essay on the "we" narrative in William Faulkner's “A Rose for Emily”?

Possible theses about the collective narrator in William Faulkner's “A Rose for Emily” include the claim that the “we” narrator is meant to reveal the communal nature of the South and Miss Emily's status as an outsider, and the claim that the “we” narrator attempts to draw the reader into the community and its perspectives.

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One of the most interesting literary choices in William Faulkner's short story “A Rose for Emily” is the collective narrator, the “we” of the community that tells the story of Miss Emily. This “we” is meant both to show the communal nature of the South at the time of the story and to emphasize how much of an outsider Miss Emily has become.

The second sentence of the previous paragraph could work well as a thesis statement for an essay about the issues and effects of the collective narrator in this story. Remember that a thesis statement makes a claim that can be supported with evidence and explanation drawn from the story. To support the thesis above, one would have to discuss the ways in which the community is united in thought and action as well as how that community unity excludes Miss Emily.

Another possible thesis about this topic might be something like the following: The collective narrator used in “A Rose for Emily” is designed to draw the reader into the story and make them part of the community and its ideas.

One might also evaluate how successful this attempt is, thinking carefully about whether or not the reader is actually drawn into the community and its views. Again, be sure to support the claim with direct evidence from the story and an explanation and interpretation of that evidence.

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