What would be an exposé on Saki (H. H. Munro), referring to biographical information, his other works ("The Interlopers," "Mrs. Packletide's Tiger"), his accomplishments, and his fundamental beliefs in his writing? This should be done in conjunction with the settings, themes, and literary elements used in his writing.

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H. H. Munro (1870–1916), generally known by his pen name, Saki, originally wrote as a journalist, then turned to short fiction and novels—often satirical—as well as nonfiction. Born into an English military family in Burma (now Myanmar), he grew up in England and Europe. Munro briefly served in the...

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H. H. Munro (1870–1916), generally known by his pen name, Saki, originally wrote as a journalist, then turned to short fiction and novels—often satirical—as well as nonfiction. Born into an English military family in Burma (now Myanmar), he grew up in England and Europe. Munro briefly served in the military police in Burma before returning to England and, as a foreign correspondent, began what became a successful writing career. After volunteering for service in World War I, he was killed in France.

In both stories, as he often does, Munro primarily uses irony. He also chooses settings distant from England and, with few words, creates characters who resonate with the reader’s knowledge of human nature.

In “The Interlopers,” George and Ulrich are two men who have long been feuding over ownership of a piece of property in the Carpathian mountains. Meeting in the woods to fight over the land, each plans to dominate the other. After being trapped by a fallen tree, however, they reconcile their differences. Unfortunately, as they call for help, their shouts attract wolves.

In “Mrs. Packletide's Tiger,” after her rival, Loona Bimberton, gains fame by flying in an airplane, Mrs. Packletide decides to outdo her by shooting a tiger in India. Recruiting help from some villagers, they find an old tiger and tie up a goat as bait. Unfortunately, the lady is a bad shot and kills the goat. The elderly tiger does die, however, of an apparent heart attack. Bribing her companion, Miss Mebbin, and the others not to reveal the truth, Mrs. Packletide gains her desired fame.

Saki’s pointed but usually mild rebukes of human nature earned him success in his lifetime and enduring popularity. He accurately dissects people’s foibles and usually arranges for their comeuppance but sometimes allows the undeserving—like the tiger “hunter”—their modest triumphs, as often happens in real life. At other times, however, they get eaten by wolves.

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