What is an example of a syllogism or construct of logic (inductive or deductive) in Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte? Goal: Analyze of how/why the term establishes meaning in the passage. Avoid mere...

What is an example of a syllogism or construct of logic (inductive or deductive) in Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte?

Goal: Analyze of how/why the term establishes meaning in the passage. Avoid mere summary or paraphrasing. This section is purely analytical and sound in argument. Also connect this specific meaning to one of Bronte's rhetorical purposes. 

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mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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In Volume III, Chapter 8 (Chapter 34), St. John takes Jane for a walk in the glen of an evening. As they rest from their trek at a "battalion of rocks," St. John proposes that Jane accompany him on his missionary work as his wife, proffering logical reasons that Jane would be a good companion to him in his work, such as the fact that she possesses the "mental endowments" and he can stand beside her until she become [subjunctive mood has no s] as strong and apt as he.

However, Jane refutes his argument.:

  • When St. John insists that he claim Jane as a missionary wife, she rebuts, "I am not fit for it; I have no vocation."
  • St. John counters that no one is fit in the beginning, but he can be her "Rock of Ages" until she becomes stronger in her vocation. Jane rebuts, "I do not understand a missionary life; I have never studied missionary labors."
  • St. John offers to help her until she can "stand" on her own; Jane insists that she feels "no light kindling--no life quickening--no voice counseling or cheering."
  • St. John insists that Jane will be invaluable to him. Jane knows that she is capable of doing what St. John bids her, but her emotions tell her "no." [Rhetorical purpose:]

But I feel mine is not an existence to be long protracted under an Indian sun.

Jane is charged by her heart to act in a different way, just as she was unable to comply when so cruelly mistreated as was the long suffering Helen who endured. And, for Jane, who heart wins in its rule as she returns to Thornfield and finds Mr. Rochester.

Sources:

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