Derek Walcott

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What would an analysis be of the eleventh section in "The Schooner Flight"?

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In the eleventh and final section of Derek Walcott's "The Schooner Flight," the speaker achieves a state of calm, expressing this by saying,

I wanted nothing after that day.

"That day" occurred when the speaker gave up his desire for Maria Concepcion. He imagines her marrying the ocean,...

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In the eleventh and final section of Derek Walcott's "The Schooner Flight," the speaker achieves a state of calm, expressing this by saying,

I wanted nothing after that day.

"That day" occurred when the speaker gave up his desire for Maria Concepcion. He imagines her marrying the ocean, the white foam on the surface of the sea compared to the "lace" of her wedding train, with the seagulls her bridesmaids. These lovely images give the speaker peace.

In the second stanza of the final section, the speaker continues to use calming imagery, such as "fall, gently, rain," and "satisfied." The speaker has reached a place where he is content because he "gave voice to one people’s grief." The stanza ends at a cliffhanger—"I have only one theme"—which pulls us into the poem's final statement.

Shabine has given up the

vain search for one island that heals with its harbor
and a guiltless horizon
His theme is achieving a oneness with nature and taking on a fatalistic attitude now that his work is done, saying "things must fall, and so it always was."
Now he will stop talking. He will read and work and become one with the sea. His imagery in this final stanza suggests he's losing his solid, corporeal form and becoming softer and more airy. He is attune with the "soft-scissored foam," and he faces a "cloud" which is like a door. Imagery of white and moonlight, repeated twice, suggests death or some form of gentle merger with nature.
This stanza provides a sense of closure and completion: the work is over and peace descends.
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