How does Winston's behavior change in 1984?

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As the story progresses, Winston gradually becomes more rebellious. He's no longer prepared to accept life as a humble functionary in the Outer Party; he wants to play his part in overthrowing the tyrannical state which he serves. Deep down he knows that one day he'll be crushed by the...

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As the story progresses, Winston gradually becomes more rebellious. He's no longer prepared to accept life as a humble functionary in the Outer Party; he wants to play his part in overthrowing the tyrannical state which he serves. Deep down he knows that one day he'll be crushed by the regime as with so many others before him. But if he's going to go down, then he might as well go down fighting.

This attitude of quiet defiance leads him to act recklessly, taking risks that will bring him one step closer to being vaporized: the recording of subversive thoughts in the diary, the illicit love affair with Julia, the involvement with what he thinks is the anti-government resistance. All of these activities show Winston becoming bolder in his defiance of the Party.

But Winston is ultimately caught out by the Party, as he always knew he would be. Subjected to prolonged and painful torture and forced to confront his innermost fears in the hellish confines of Room 101, Winston finally gives up the ghost and cracks under pressure. Whether Winston has truly changed in the very depths of his soul is a moot point, but outwardly at least he has indeed undergone a profound transformation. For he now loves Big Brother.

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In the beginning, Winston just goes through the daily routine of work and home, ever aware of Big Brother's presence everywhere. While his job requires him to rewrite "reality" according to the Party, he tries to remember his past. In his dreams, he envisions a place where there's peace. He feels cut off from everyone since relationships aren't allowed. This is why he gets involved with Julia and becomes friends with O'Brien. Winston's secret individuality gets him into trouble in the end, however. He's tortured and brainwashed until he loses his desire for individuality and says he loves Big Brother. He becomes an alcoholic who is only a shell of what he used to be once he gives into Big Brother.

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