What is "willing suspension of disbelief"?  How does having a willing suspension of disbelief help Mrs. Murry?

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To have a "willing suspension of disbelief" means to be able to forget what you know to be true and accept things that are not realistic according to science. This ability helps Mrs. Murry, who is a scientist. As a scientist, she is trained to test ideas, or hypotheses, and...

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To have a "willing suspension of disbelief" means to be able to forget what you know to be true and accept things that are not realistic according to science. This ability helps Mrs. Murry, who is a scientist. As a scientist, she is trained to test ideas, or hypotheses, and decide if they are true or false based on physical evidence. However, by suspending her disbelief, she is able to accept and believe things that she cannot prove. She is able to feel comfortable with the unknown. As a result, Mrs. Murry seems very relaxed when strange things happen to her family, such as the disappearance of her husband, her youngest son's strange ways, the arrival of the strange beings Mrs. Whatsit, Mrs. Which, and Mrs. Who.

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You are talking about the "willing suspension of disbelief". The romantic poet Coleridge came up with the phrase to explain how a reader can engage with a text even if the events or themes are not strictly realistic. The reader is encouraged to overlook the plausibility of events and just appreciate the story outside of reality. So, happily leave off what you know to be true.

As a scientist, this allows Mrs. Murry to be open to ideas that current science might not have answers for. She is more willing to entertain the idea of a tesseract, for example.

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