What will happen when the wind blows among the trees in "To a Butterfly"?

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At the end of the first stanza, the speaker of the poem says that this butterfly will be "call[ed]...forth again" when the breeze has "found [it] out among the trees." In other words, when the breeze blows through the trees, the butterfly will feel such "joy" that it will dance...

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At the end of the first stanza, the speaker of the poem says that this butterfly will be "call[ed]...forth again" when the breeze has "found [it] out among the trees." In other words, when the breeze blows through the trees, the butterfly will feel such "joy" that it will dance into motion again. The speaker has been watching the creature for a half an hour as it sits on a yellow flower in an orchard, and it has paused for such a long period of time that the speaker is unsure if the butterfly has fallen asleep or if it is feeding from the flower. It is motionless, he says, as motionless as "frozen seas" are.

He goes on to invite the butterfly to come back for a visit, as the speaker owns the trees and the speaker's sister the flowers, and he says that the butterfly should think of the place as a "sanctuary," where they can all talk together of their childhoods that felt so long but, in hindsight, seem to have been so short. He asks the butterfly to stay a little longer, as it reminds him of his childhood. "Dead times revive in thee," the speaker says to the butterfly.

The speaker recalls his youth, when he would chase butterflies with his sister, Emmeline, and he would rush upon his prey like a hunter on the chase while she would be quite gentle instead.

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