What were the two ceremonies that Mr. Hooper directed on the same day that he began to wear the veil?

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First of all, Mr. Hooper conducts a funeral for a young lady who's recently passed away. This is one of the few places where the wearing of a black veil is entirely appropriate. Even so, Mr. Hooper's veil still looks more than a little weird, and distracts everyone's attention.

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First of all, Mr. Hooper conducts a funeral for a young lady who's recently passed away. This is one of the few places where the wearing of a black veil is entirely appropriate. Even so, Mr. Hooper's veil still looks more than a little weird, and distracts everyone's attention.

Later that day, the reverend is called upon to officiate at a marriage ceremony in church. This is supposed to be a joyous, happy occasion, and yet Mr. Hooper puts everyone on a real downer by insisting on wearing his black veil. The bride-to-be is so scared by Hooper's gloomy appearance that she starts to tremble. It doesn't just seem like she's seen a ghost; it seems like she actually is a ghost, the ghost of the young lady that Mr. Hooper buried earlier in the day.

Whatever the reasons behind Mr. Hooper's wearing of the veil, we know that they must be serious, else why would he wear it during a marriage ceremony?

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On the same day that Mr. Hooper began to wear the veil, he directed a funeral and a wedding.

Mr. Hooper preached the morning and afternoon sermons before he presided over both ceremonies, however. At the church, Mr. Hooper's appearance created confusion and anxiety among his parishioners.

As the story progresses, we learn how Mr. Hooper's black veil exposes the latent fears and superstitions of his parishioners. They are afraid of him because the meaning of his covered face remains hidden to them. Despite the universal dread among the congregation, no one dares to confront Mr. Hooper about the reasons for his strange new habit.

At the funeral, those who are gathered find no comfort in Mr. Hooper's words. They imagine that their preacher already walks with the dead. There is a similar response to Mr. Hooper at the wedding in Milford Village. No one feels like celebrating, as Mr. Hooper's veil casts a malignant cloud over the couple's union. Hawthorne uses visual imagery to great effect here:

But the bride's cold fingers quivered in the tremulous hand of the bridegroom, and her deathlike paleness caused a whisper that the maiden who had been buried a few hours before was come from her grave to be married.

The specter of death hovers over what should have been a happy celebration. Mr. Hooper's veil causes everyone to think of death and its hold upon each person. So, the black veil symbolizes the power of death and the fears it inspires in us.

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First, Mr. Hooper officiates at a funeral service for a young woman.  There, his veil was "an appropriate emblem," because it, too, seems solemn and somber and thus matches the mood of the funeral.  Also, black is a color often associated with death and mourning, so it is appropriate for that reason as well.  One old superstitious woman thinks that, as he leaned over the deceased girl and the veil fell slightly away from his face so that the girl could have seen his face if she were alive, the body of the dead girl actually shuddered.

Next, Mr. Hooper officiates at a wedding ceremony.  The presence of the veil here seems completely inappropriate and incongruous to the occasion.  The sight of it makes the "bride's cold fingers" quiver "in the tremulous hand of the bridegroom, and her deathlike paleness caused a whisper that the maiden who had been buried a few hours before was come from her grave to be married."  In short, Mr. Hooper's veiled face fairly terrifies the young couple and casts a pall of gloom over the entire proceedings.  Finally, he catches sight of his own reflection and is so overcome with its horrors that he drops his wine and runs out into the night.

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