What were the features of Greenwich Village that attracted the artists?

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In his short story "The Last Leaf," O. Henry gives a couple of reasons why artists moved to Greenwich Village.

The first and most obvious reason was the low rents. As Henry suggests in the story, at that point in the New York City's history, they were still...

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In his short story "The Last Leaf," O. Henry gives a couple of reasons why artists moved to Greenwich Village.

The first and most obvious reason was the low rents. As Henry suggests in the story, at that point in the New York City's history, they were still in the process of making it into the city it is today. So though it was popular with European immigrants (it was the easiest city for Europeans to get to), in some places, the city was quite poor.

Yet while Greenwich village was a cheap neighborhood to live in, it was also, as O. Henry says, "quaint." The Dutch attics and eighteenth-century gables were located in "a maze of the narrow and moss-grown "places." In Henry's story, for example, quite unique to a major city, the character has an ivy vine growing up the wall outside her house.

Finally, at the beginning of the story, Henry states that the area was divided into so many different places that they made "strange angles and curves." Any money collector going there to collect upon his bills could easily be avoided.

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