What were some of the personal qualities of Mohandas Gandhi?  

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One of Gandhi's most notable qualities was persistence. As one of the leading members of the Indian independence movement, he knew that it would take a lot of hard work, effort, and, of course, persistence to throw off the yoke of British imperialism.

The British had been in charge of...

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One of Gandhi's most notable qualities was persistence. As one of the leading members of the Indian independence movement, he knew that it would take a lot of hard work, effort, and, of course, persistence to throw off the yoke of British imperialism.

The British had been in charge of India for centuries and, with their superior firepower and economic strength, could not easily be removed by force. Not that Gandhi, an avowed pacifist and apostle of non-violence, would ever have endorsed any violent overthrow of the Raj, but in any event, it simply wouldn't have been possible.

Gandhi's strategy of non-violent resistance inevitably required extraordinary patience as well as immense courage. Many pro-independence campaigners balked at Gandhi's pacifism precisely because they thought that, as a political strategy, it would take way too long to end British rule in India.

But Gandhi stayed true to his beliefs, even in the midst of repression. He believed, with every fiber of his being, that if the Indian independence movement persisted in its non-violent campaign against the British—staging peaceful protests, refusing to cooperate with the authorities, and engaging in acts of passive resistance—then British rule in India would one day come to an end. And Gandhi was proved right when the British finally relinquished their hold on Mother India—peacefully—in 1947.

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Some of Gandhi's personal qualities was an unbreakable commitment to his own values.  Research has shown that Gandhi was driven by a personal embrace of the values that he espoused on a political level.  He did not succumb to the life of political splendor while the nation of India was under the heel and hell of British rule.  He maintained a safe distance between his own status and political conferments which happened after the British left.  He lived on his own, in an ashram, spinning his own clothes, eating sparingly, and meditating on the nature of love and evil in the world.  This made him very difficult to live with on a personal level, as his own wife was estranged from him emotionally and intimately to a certain extent, as well as his own children.  As Gandhi became more driven by the need to establish a new moral order in the world which might have even superseded the political one, he became more convinced that these moral absolutes had to be lived in one's life at all costs.

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Gandhi was also about as non-materialistic as you can get.  He owned a few sets of simple clothes, and that was pretty much it.  So he was not into revolution for glory or power or money, but for social justice.  Add to this the fact that he was able to prove non-violent tactics could work to overcome the might of the British Empire.  Can you imagine even having the guts to try in a colonial time period such as that?  So I would have to add bravery and resourcefulness.

Still, Gandhi could not have done it on his own, so in addition, Gandhi was a teacher.  He spread his ideas to the masses, and together they were able to achieve a miracle.  Other activists borrowed his ideas on non-violent resistance, so we could say he was ahead of his time also.

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Mohandas K. Gandhi (1869-1948) was a prominent Indian leader who taught people to resist British colonial rule through nonviolent means. So using what we know of his struggles we can identify him as an ethical person. He insisted that the struggle against the British should be done through nonviolent methods: not meeting aggression with retaliation. He was a very controlled person as well. He went on hunger strikes as necessary to protest British rule (and later, to encourage the Indian government to pay money owed to Pakistan). He was innovative. Noting that the British relied on economic trade with India, he instructed his followers to make their own salt and weave their own cloth. And in addition to the above, he was courageous for standing up for what's right and doing something about it.

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