What were some impacts that the Copernican Revolution in religion, politics, science, art, music, and so on? What are some things today that were significantly affected by the Copernican Revolution?

The Copernican Revolution impacted European society because it showed that long-held beliefs could be inaccurate. It promoted curiosity and scientific inquiry. This had the effect of weakening the influence of religious and political institutions.

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The Copernican Revolution made lasting impacts on the worldview of Western civilization that last to this day. At first, it challenged the view that Earth, and by extension humans, are at the center of the Universe. By demonstrating that the Earth orbits the Sun, just like the other planets, people began to question established religious dogma. The discoveries of Copernicus and other scientific theorists occurred around the same time as the Reformation. Therefore, this was already a time when Europeans were challenging the Catholic hierarchy. As a result, freedom of thought expanded throughout the continent.

When Copernicus published his theories and findings, established thought underwent a shakeup. If Earth's place in the cosmos could be revised, so too could long-held notions like the Divine Right of Kings and the supremacy of the Church. As a result, more Europeans began questioning scientific, political, and religious ideas. Many even began to formulate new theories into the nature of society as a whole. Therefore, it should come as no surprise the Enlightenment Period followed closely on the heels of the Copernican Revolution. In short, the idea of divine legitimacy lost much of its power. The Church fought back by banning the writings of many scientists and philosophers. It was not until the nineteenth century that Catholic authorities finally permitted the open discussion of many of these earlier theories.

The impacts of the Copernican Revolution can be felt to this day. While religious institutions still have a lot of influence, they no longer hold the monopoly on "truth" that they once did. Scientific inquiry is promoted, or at least supported, by most educated people. The idea that long-held beliefs need periodic revising as new information is discovered has become a driver of human progress.

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The Copernican Revolution occurred when scientific consensus converged around the idea that Earth revolves around the sun and not the sun around the Earth. This was a surprisingly revolutionary concept, as it contradicted not only the Bible but also the evidence of the senses. If you look up at the sun in the sky, it certainly does seem, during the course of a day, to be circling Earth.

One of the impacts of the Copernican Revolution was backlash. The Catholic Church understood the challenge this theory posed to Biblical orthodoxy. For example, it pulled Galileo, the superstar scientist of his time, in front of the Inquisition and forced him to retract his statements that Earth revolved around the sun. This firm stand by religious authorities led to polarization between religion and science. This could be read as the beginning of the split between scientific and theological inquiry. Up until this time, natural science was seen as one branch of theology: empirical science could help us understand God's creation—the natural world—and help to explain God's ways to humankind. It could help us discern when the Bible was literal and when metaphorical in order to better understand God's word.

The Copernican Revolution's biggest impact, therefore, was in starting to establish a rival syste—scientific rationalism—to challenge, rather than support and uphold, the traditional authority of the Church. This divide lives with us to this day.

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The major effects Copernicus caused were in religion. Suddenly the theological perspective of man's dominance in a dominant world was shown to be no longer tenable. Though Pope Paul III was not an outspoken opponent of Copernicus, his bishops and cardinals were. On their behest, the Church officially condemned Capernicus's cosmology. When friar Giordano Bruno, himself a mathematician and astronomer, upheld Copernican heliocentricity, he was subjected to execution at the order of the Inquisition, in place to find and destroy heresy. Heliocentricity uprooted the theological doctrine that the universe revolved around Man as the paramount and most glorious end-result of Creation, with the Sun, the Stars, the other Planets and the whole Universe revolving in an Aristotelian pure circle around Man, dwelling upon Earth.

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I would say that one of the major impacts we see of this today is our increasing trend towards secularism.  I am not saying that Copernicus on his own caused this.  However, his theory helped.  The reason for this is that it helped to get people to challenge the orthodoxy of the Church.  As the Church lost its place as arbiter of scientific truth, it lost some of its overall authority.  At the same time, people were being encouraged to think more scientifically, which can also lead to less religiosity.

Therefore, I would argue that Copernicus helped to bring about our modern society that gives less weight to religion than previous societies did.

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I the Copernican Revolution mostly affected sciences and religion more than anything else, and since religion had such an influence on the arts and literature, it follows that Copernicus influenced the way people thought, wrote, and painted for years to come.

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The Copernican revolution probably had its biggest impact on the way people viewed their place in the world.  The heliocentric model of the universe no longer placed man at the center of the universe and brought about quite a bit of religious upheaval for obvious reasons.  Eventually Protestants would be much more accepting of the idea than Catholics.

Some people consider the Copernican Revolution to be the start of the Scientific Revolution, so its impact in that regard in unmistakable.  As people began to look for physical evidence and experiments to explain the world around them (versus religious doctrine) a wealth of new information and ideas were uncovered.

To some degree one could also see the ideas of this revolution reflected in the cultural and philosophical shift to a more humanistic view of the world, which could easily be linked to the Copernican Revolution.

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