What were Ophelia's last words?

Ophelia's last words reflect her grief at the death of her father, emphasize the cold finality of his demise, and refer to Hamlet's cruel rejection of her. Ophelia prays for God's blessing on her late father and, ironically, on other guilty characters in the scene.

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In act 4, scene 5 of Hamlet, Ophelia speaks her final words when lamenting the death of her father, Polonius. In the presence of King Claudius, Queen Gertrude, and her own brother, Laertes, Ophelia sings,

And will he not come again?

And will he not...

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In act 4, scene 5 of Hamlet, Ophelia speaks her final words when lamenting the death of her father, Polonius. In the presence of King Claudius, Queen Gertrude, and her own brother, Laertes, Ophelia sings,

And will he not come again?

And will he not come again?
No, no, he is dead;
Go to thy deathbed;
He never will come again.

His beard was as white as snow,

All flaxen was his poll.
He is gone, he is gone,
And we cast away moan.
God 'a'mercy on his soul!
And of all Christian souls, I pray God. God b' wi' you. (4.5.188–198)

Driven insane by Polonius's death as well as Hamlet's violent rebuff, Ophelia reverts to childish, singsong words throughout act 4, scene 5. She emphasizes the finality and fatality of her father's end by asking twice, "And will he not come again?" and then answering her own question with the straightforward "No, no, he is dead" and "He never will come again." The next line, "Go to thy deathbed," echoes Hamlet's spurning of Ophelia in act 3, scene 1 and the mad admonishment, "Get thee to a nunnery."

Ophelia describes the aged patriarch Polonius through simile: he had a beard and hair as white as "snow" and pure "flax" flowers. These contrast the flowers Ophelia gave to the other characters earlier in the scene: rosemary for remembrance, pansies for thoughts, fennel and columbine for unfaithfulness, rue for repentance, and daisy for unhappy love. Fittingly, she does not give them violets for faithfulness, because "they withered all when my father died" (183–4).

She repeats "he is gone" twice and points back to herself and other living characters as those who "moan" his mortal exit. Her mourning from grief, however, contrasts Claudius's unsettled state of relief as a result of being nearly—but not—killed.

Finally, Ophelia prays for God's blessing on not only Polonius, but also "you," or Claudius and Gertrude. Ironically, she does not seem to realize that Hamlet killed Polonius and that Claudius was the intended victim. Most tellingly, Ophelia is so insane with grief that she fails to recognize that her own brother, Laertes, has arrived to avenge their father's death.

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