What were the negative aspects of life in America in the 1950s?What were the negative aspects of life in America in the 1950s?  

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litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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The fifties were a time of prosperity and social adjustment. Both women and men came out of World War II different. Older men and women were often coping with loss, if they had sons who died in the war. Younger men and women were struggling with their roles. Women were expected to stay at home and raise the children and men were supposed to be breadwinners. But there was a large gap in their lives from the war years. The men might have been headed for bright futures, and now returned to try to pick up where they left off. Often they had children vert quickly, before they had really gotten their relationship on firm footing. Many young couples married on the spur of the moment before he went off to war, and she spent days writing letters while both had romantic dreams of life after he came home that no one could live up to.
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pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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There were at least two negative aspects of life in the US during the 1950s.

First, to a certain segment of the youth of the US, the '50s were a stifling time.  They felt that they had no way to express their individuality.  They felt that their society was excessively materialistic.  These "problems" helped lead to the counterculture of the '60s.

Second, US society during that time was oppressive towards various segments of society.  Perhaps the two most notable of these segments were women and racial minorities.  The '50s were a time when women's roles were diminished and women were being expected more and more to stay home and be housewives.  Blacks in the South, meanwhile, were living under conditions of segregation.  These facts made this time less than a golden age for those groups.

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