What do we learn about Eliza and Georgiana Reed, and why did Brontë bring them back into the novel later?

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In Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë, Eliza and Georgiana Reed act as foils to the eponymous heroine. As is the case with their mother and brother as well, they are antagonists to the heroine and illustrate two opposite types of character flaw.

Georgiana is a vapid young woman whose only asset is that she is pretty and blonde. She is devoted to a life of pleasure and self indulgence and illustrates the negative aspects of a lazy and selfish character with no concern other than immediate pleasure. Although Eliza Reed is more self-controlled than Georgiana and appears deeply religious on the surface, she is also mean-spirited and seems motivated in her religion more by jealousy and hatred than by love.

The two sisters appear at the end of the novel to show that their initial advantages of wealth and status were undermined by their bad characters. While Jane has a happy marriage and even visits Mrs. Reed's deathbed, the two sisters never transcend their fundamentally bad natures and do not achieve...

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