In what ways were the English colonies alike in the 17th and 18th centuries, and in what ways were they regionally distinctive?

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The colonies were alike in that they all had close ties to England. They were mainly inhabited by English-speaking people. Aside from some of Maryland, they were largely Protestant. They had their own forms of self-government, but they owed their allegiance to Parliament and the King. All the colonies experienced trouble with native groups at one time or another. All the colonies had someone who owned at least one slave, though some colonial societies were more dependent on this than others. The colonists also observed English customs such as having tea.

Regionally, the colonies were quite different. In the South, slaves were needed to work large-scale plantations. The South grew cash crops such as sugar and tobacco; towards the latter part of the period, many would make the shift to cotton. Southerners more more likely to live farther apart since their farms were large. Malaria was also a problem in the South.

In the North, people lived on smaller farms and in urban areas. Many New...

(The entire section contains 4 answers and 954 words.)

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