What are three ways Fitzgerald criticized the American Dream in The Great Gatsby?

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For Fitzgerald, the American dream is Gatsby's dream writ large. Gatsby believes he can roll back time and start over from the period five years past when he and Daisy were young and in love. He dreams of the two of them having an idyllic future together. Likewise, according...

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For Fitzgerald, the American dream is Gatsby's dream writ large. Gatsby believes he can roll back time and start over from the period five years past when he and Daisy were young and in love. He dreams of the two of them having an idyllic future together. Likewise, according to Nick, when the first settlers from Europe saw the American continent they dreamed of starting anew and building a land of opportunity in which people could achieve an idyllic future.

Fitzgerald shows the failure of the American dream in many ways, but three examples are the following.

The American dream did not eradicate the class system. As in Europe, some have excessive wealth while some must live, as the Wilsons do, in the metaphorical Valley of the Ashes. Daisy has everything money can buy, but her butler has a nose problem brought on by a job where he had to polish too much silver:

Well, he wasn’t always a butler; he used to be the silver polisher for some people in New York that had a silver service for two hundred people. He had to polish it from morning till night until finally it began to affect his nose

Further, much like an Old World aristocrat, Tom can prey on the lower classes, the chambermaids, and poor wives of garage owners.

Second, Old World issues like racism and sexism have not been eradicated. Tom's belief in the superiority of the Nordic "race" threads through the book. Daisy hopes her daughter will end up beautiful and stupid, so that she will be able to get along better in the world.

Third, Gatsby's tragic fate is an indictment of the American dream of setting back the clock and starting anew. As Nick tries to tell Gatsby, you can't turn back time. Gatsby's dream, audacious as it is, mirrors the American dream's failure.

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For the purpose of this question, we'll define the American dream as the idea that anyone can start out poor, and rise to become rich through hard, honest labor.

With that definition, here are three criticisms that can be drawn from The Great Gatsby:

  1. The American dream does not work for everyone. George Wilson has done hard, honest work for many years since his marriage, but is in the same economic and social class as when he began. He lives in the Valley of Ashes. His wife Myrtle is discontented with their life, and has an affair with a rich man (Tom) to enjoy the good things in life. George finally plans to move out West with Myrtle to get her away from her lover (and to pursue the American dream there?), but she is hit by a car before they can leave. 
  2. The rich are not any happier or morally better than the poor. This is seen from the decadent, foolish behavior of the guests at Gatsby's parties; the excruciatingly un-fun party given by Tom and Myrtle at the apartment where he keeps her; and Tom and Daisy's tortured lives.
  3. The new rich are not really accepted or admired. Gatsby is an example of a newly rich person. He gives lavish parties, and everyone loves to come to them. Once Gatsby is killed, though, Nick cannot convince any of the former partygoers to attend Gatsby's funeral. They are all too busy with trivial things, or "don't want to get involved." It becomes obvious people attended Gatsby's parties just for the good time they offered, but did not respect Gatsby or consider him one of them. 
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