In what ways is Emily's honor in "A Rose for Emily" similar/different to Montresor's in "The Cask of Amontillado"?I have a pretty good understanding of honor as far as Montresor is concerned.  I'm...

In what ways is Emily's honor in "A Rose for Emily" similar/different to Montresor's in "The Cask of Amontillado"?

I have a pretty good understanding of honor as far as Montresor is concerned.  I'm just having trouble with Emily's honor and how it compares to Montresor.

Asked on by russarron

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bullgatortail | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

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I would not consider either Montresor's or Emily's actions honorable--murder is rarely an honorable act--but I'm sure both of them believe that they were defending themselves against men who had wronged them. Both Montresor and Emily come from old and aristocratic families. Emily's fortunes have taken a turn for the worst, leaving her virtually penniless. Although Montresor lives in a "palazzo" and is able to employ servants, we know that Fortunato is more powerful and influential and considers Montresor a lesser man. (Fortunato forgets Montresor's coat-of-arms and scoffs at the possibility that he may be a Mason). Both Emily and Montresor decide that murder is the only way to exact revenge upon the injuries that have been inflicted upon them, and they both decide to keep the bodies well within reach--Homer in Emily's bed, and Fortunato in Montresor's catacombs. The bodies will be discovered only after the murderers' deaths--and in Montresor's case, possibly never.

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