In what ways does Shakespeare present ideas of freedom and slavery in The Tempest? (Act III, scenes 1 & 2.)

Expert Answers info

D. Reynolds eNotes educator | Certified Educator

calendarEducator since 2016

write9,536 answers

starTop subjects are Literature, History, and Social Sciences

In Act III, scene 1, Ferdinand though a royal, serves as a willing slave to Prospero. He does this because he is in love with Miranda, saying:

The very instant that I saw you did

My heart fly to your service; there resides,

To make me slave to it

He performs Caliban's work of carrying logs, but does it without complaining, because of Miranda. When she offers to help him, he won't hear of it.

But if Ferdinand is a willing slave for Miranda's sake, she also promises to be his: "I’ll be your servant / Whether you will or no."

In the next scene, the action turns to Caliban, who, after drinking with Trinculo, and Stephano, claims to that he has been cruelly...

(The entire section contains 2 answers and 341 words.)

Unlock This Answer Now


check Approved by eNotes Editorial

gbeatty eNotes educator | Certified Educator

calendarEducator since 2007

write2,654 answers

starTop subjects are Literature, History, and Science

Further Reading:

check Approved by eNotes Editorial