In what ways did Native Americans resist the Indian Removal Act?

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The Indian Removal Act of 1830 had a major impact on Native Americans living in the US. The Removal Act was heavily supported by then President Andrew Jackson. Jackson saw the replacement of the indigenous tribes living in southern states like Georgia and Florida with white farmers and settlers as...

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The Indian Removal Act of 1830 had a major impact on Native Americans living in the US. The Removal Act was heavily supported by then President Andrew Jackson. Jackson saw the replacement of the indigenous tribes living in southern states like Georgia and Florida with white farmers and settlers as inevitable. It was a natural continuation of the devastation experienced by Native American tribes in the northern states in the early colonial period.

While there was some political resistance to the Indian Removal Act, it passed and was thoroughly enforced. It led to mass migrations of indigenous tribes from the east to areas west of the Mississippi, like the Oklahoma territory. This migration became know as "The Trail of Tears." The Cherokee, whose ancestral land was in Georgia, made a relatively successful transition west. But it was forced upon them. Given the racial dynamics of the South, the choice was either relocate or face extinction and genocide.

A few groups resisted. The Seminoles in Florida fought the US government. This was known as the Second Seminole War (1835–1842). These groups of Native Americans successfully resisted and were allowed to stay in Florida in the backwaters and swamps in the center of the state, land obviously less than desirable for agriculture or settlement.

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