What were William Blake's political views?

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William Blake's political views, much like his religious views, were outside of the traditional mold. He championed change and revolution. He lived during the French Revolution of the 1790s, which shook up the whole of Europe with its massive overhaul of the monarchy in favor of a more democratic system (though he later became disenchanted with the revolution, feeling it replaced one system of tyranny with another).

He was also sensitive to the plight of the poor and underprivileged classes. His Songs of Innocence and Experience depict orphaned children being forced to work as chimney sweeps, often dying young. He also opposed slavery.

Blake distrusted the monarchy and organized religion. He was in favor of sexual freedom. Basically, he was the ultimate individualist, and this is reflected in his politics, which are hard to pin down under simple labels.

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While he seldom wrote directly of politics, William Blake was associated with the young radicals in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries that lionized the American and especially the French Revolutions and hoped that they pointed the way for increased democratization of English government. He moved in the same circles as such noted radicals as Mary Wollstonecraft, Thomas Paine, and Richard Price, all of whom saw events in France as the harbinger of similar events to come in England. Blake also published a highly sympathetic account of the French Revolution. He was known to be an opponent of the established church in England and a supporter of civil liberties. Above all, he championed the individual, and saw the world he lived in as a changing place, in which people would become freer. 

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