What was the Vietnam war?the details of Vietnam war

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litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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The Vietnam War was the Cold War erupting into a hot war. The United States was desperate to prevent the spread of Communism anywhere. We were worried that if one country in Asia became Communist, they all would fall and we would lose our dominance in the world. They would also be strong allies for Russia, who was after all trying to wipe us off the face of the Earth.
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kapokkid | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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In order to get actual details about the Vietnam War, you might want to pick up a few books that will give you a clearer indication of their perspective and bias.

-"Red Thunder, Tropic Lightning" is a very interesting text giving most of the history of the 25th Infantry Division during the Vietnam conflict (don't forget we never declared war...)

-"Vietnam.  A Portrait of its People at War" gives a far more detailed look at the political, philosophical, social, and other conditions in Vietnam at the time of the war, aspects that are largely ignored in most accounts of the war and our involvement in it

Of course there are also tons of text books and tons of websites that you could consult as well.  But if you want details, it will take time and likely a lot of reading.

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Ashley Kannan | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

This one will give you much in way of posts that will feature different ideas about this conflict.  The exact and comprehensive details of Vietnam will not be able to be fully explained here.  The Vietnam War was part of the larger issue of the Cold War, where America positioned itself against the Communist Soviet Union and the notion of Communism, in general.  Contributing to the time period's fear of Communist expansion, American government from the time of President Eisenhower on was concerned with being able to place a full container on the growth of Communism.  In the late stages of Eisenhower's Presidency and through that of President Kennedy's, the fear growing in both administrations was one rooted in the domino theory, which was the belief that if one nation in a particular region went Communist, all of the nations in that area would follow suit.  When Vietnam declared its independence from France, the emergence of a Communist North and non- Communist South Vietnams developed into a civil war.  The United States slowly became drawn into this conflict, at first sending military "advisors" to South Vietnam in assisting them repel the Communist advancement.  From this, the role of advisor moved into pure active agent and the United States involvement in the region became one where Communist North ended up battling the South, but more the United States. It was an expansive war, causing huge amounts of casualties on both sides, but probably costing more political support to leaders like President Johnson, who intensified the war effort, and historically to President Nixon, who helped see the war to an end, but only with a massive bombing campaign that spilled over into other neighboring nations.  Vietnam became more than a war, but a state of mind that shook American confidence and began a sense of cynicism between the actions and stated beliefs of government and its relationship to its citizens.

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