What was the result of the Boxer Rebellion for China?

Results of the Boxer Rebellion for China included that the detested colonials created spheres of influence within a fragmented China, drawing ideological lines that would lead to revolution and world war. To this day, mistrust of foreigners and the identification of the country as historical victim persist as defining elements of the official Chinese cultural narrative.

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The main consequence of the Boxer Rebellion was the subsequent modernization of many aspects of Chinese society. The failure of the Rebellion and the ruthless manner of its suppression by the Western colonial authorities had convinced many that China had to change if it were to break free from the...

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The main consequence of the Boxer Rebellion was the subsequent modernization of many aspects of Chinese society. The failure of the Rebellion and the ruthless manner of its suppression by the Western colonial authorities had convinced many that China had to change if it were to break free from the shackles of colonial rule and eventually become an independent nation.

To that end, the Empress Dowager Cixi, who had backed the Boxer Rebellion, initiated a series of reforms designed to turn China into a constitutional monarchy. Such reforms included changes to the complicated civil service exam and the introduction of a more modern education system. Ironically, Cixi—who, as we've seen, supported the anticolonial Boxer Rebellion—now instituted a host of reforms intended to make China more like the West.

Despite these reforms, however, it soon became clear that the Qing dynasty had been severely weakened by the Boxer Rebellion and its subsequent suppression and was therefore no longer capable of instituting the kind of radical reforms needed to enable China to enter the modern world. It is no exaggeration to say that the Boxer Rebellion signaled the beginning of the end for the Qing dynasty, as well as centuries of monarchical rule in China.

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After the Boxer embarrassment, the Qing dynasty lost any remaining legitimacy it might have held with the restive Chinese nation. Empress Dowager CiXi, whose material support and boosterism fueled the Boxer resistance, was forced to concede to the demand for reform.

The brief, turbulent period of the early Chinese Republic that followed the fall of the Qing in the second decade of the twentieth century introduced Western ideas about science, education, and social policy that coalesced into a republican movement of military nationalists in the Japanese and German vein. Correspondingly, the internationalist political and economic theories introduced to educated young, urban Chinese in these years added other ideological movements to the simmering Chinese crucible, like Mao Zedong’s socialism with Chinese characteristics.

These conflicting forces of class-based society-wide revolution and reactionary military-industrial statism flourished in the power vacuum left by the disintegration of the ancient empire following the crippling post-Boxer indemnities. Japan’s occupation of China led to its alignment with the Chinese Nationalist government against the rising communist revolution. Just before the Boxer rebellion, Japan had become emboldened by its 1895 victory in territorial warfare against China and with its permanent presence in China consolidated its dominance of Northeastern Asia.

At the same time, the United States was also emerging as a global power with its control of the Philippines since the end of the Spanish-American War of 1898. The added economic concessions given American corporate interests added to the lingering resentment against foreign imperialist powers that provided the Chinese Communists an idealized foil against which to rally the support of the masses for revolution against the corrupt and exploitive status quo. The powerful nationalist state that emerged in the 1920s and 30s under Jiang Jia Shi was viewed as a puppet of Western imperialism, and in fact, the Chinese nationalists became crucial American allies against the marauding Japanese before and during the Second World War. It was Japanese resentment about an assertive American military presence in the Eastern Pacific that eventually led to the Japanese empire’s attacking the US naval fleet at Pearl Harbor, bringing isolationist America into Word War II.

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In 1900, the Boxer Rebellion occurred in China. A group of people, from a secret society known as Society of the Righteous and Harmonious Fists, rebelled against what they believed was an increasing amount of foreign influence. They killed both foreigners and Chinese Christians and seized property owned by foreigners. The Boxer Rebellion was eventually ended in 1901 as the Japanese and the Western powers created a force to deal with the rebellion. The Boxer Rebellion had a significant impact on Chinese society.

There was some concern that China would lose its independence. While that didn’t happen, China had to a pay over $300 million in reparations. Those involved in the Boxer Rebellion were punished. Foreign countries were allowed to keep troops in Beijing to protect their diplomatic representatives. China was not allowed to import weapons for two years. The effect of these requirements ultimately weakened the Qing Dynasty, eventually leading to its demise in 1912.

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The direct consequence of the Boxer Rebellion of 1900 was that the ruling Chinese Qing dynasty became even weaker and foreign influence in China continued.

The Boxer Rebellion was a rebellion staged by an anti-foreigner Chinese society known for their "boxing" skills in physical exercise and defense. The Rebellion was ended when a multi-national force ended the Rebellion and China had to sign the Boxer Protocol in 1901. China lost not only a huge sum of money to foreign nations as a result of the agreement, but it could also not import arms and it had to give more rights and permissions to foreign troops.

So basically, the uprising that intended to end the presence of foreign powers in China made the foreigner's hand even stronger when it ended.

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The major result of the Boxer Rebellion was that the Ch'ing Dynasty lost a great deal of credibility and power and a group of reformers gained power.

The Manchu Ch'ing Dynasty had already been deeply unpopular among Chinese.  Now, it lost most of its remaining credibility because it had not been able to either suppress the Boxers or control the foreign response.  The dynasty had to sign a very unequal treaty after the Rebellion, further weakening it in the eyes of the Chinese people.

Because of this, power started to flow to regional leaders and to radical reformers like Sun Yat-sen.  This led relatively quickly to the fall of the Ch'ing Dynasty in 1911 and the rise of conflicts in China between various warlords and political factions that would continue up until the establishment of the People's Republic of China in 1949.

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