What was Stalin's effect on Russian politics?

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Perhaps no leader in Russia did more to quiet political discussion and debate than Josef Stalin. Due to his desire to stay in power and his severe paranoia, he killed or exiled political rivals or those who he perceived could become political rivals. 

By the mid-to-late 1930s, Stalin had significantly...

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Perhaps no leader in Russia did more to quiet political discussion and debate than Josef Stalin. Due to his desire to stay in power and his severe paranoia, he killed or exiled political rivals or those who he perceived could become political rivals. 

By the mid-to-late 1930s, Stalin had significantly turned against the ideals of the Communist Party as it stood when first established by Vladimir Lenin in the early 1920s. 

Stalin's rule brought with it a new name for his form of government — Stalinism. One of the key tenets of Stalinism was that even though there was a largely capitalist world surrounding Russia, the Soviet Union could still build a classless society based on communist principles. Stalin attempted to do so through oppression and force.

Three years after Stalin died, Soviet Premier Nikita Krushchev renounced Stalinism and the Stalin regime. Soviet leaders defined the regime as an aberration to what the Soviet Union should be and attempted to bring policies back into alignment with Lenin's original goals.

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