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Battle Of The Bulge Significance

What is the significance of the Battle of the Bulge?

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brettd eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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To come up with the divisions he needed to launch this offensive, Hitler turned to his last reserves of manpower:  the old, the young, and those previously deemed unfit for military service.  He tried to season this army with battle-hardened SS tank units from the Eastern Front.  If that gamble didn't work, Germany would be naked to an Allied offensive, which is exactly what happened.

So the significance of the Battle of the Bulge was that Germany's defeat and the end of the war in Europe came sooner, and at a lower cost in Allied lives than it would have otherwise.

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besure77 eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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The Battle of the Bulge, or Ardennes Offensive was the last major Nazi offensive in World War II. It started on December 16, 1944. One of the goals of this battle was to split the allies in two. This battle is significant because it was Hitlers plan to destabilize the allies and take control of the port of Antwerp. Antwerp was the port in which many supplies were delivered to the allies. It is also significant because this battle was planned by the Germans and it backfired. It was the largest battle in World War II and had many casualties.

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pohnpei397 eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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This was the last battle in which the Germans had any chance to change the outcome of the war.  If they had won this battle, they might have been able to negotiate a truce instead of having to surrender unconditionally.

What the Germans were trying to do in this battle was to push their way up to the North Sea at such Belgian ports as Antwerp.  Once they got there, they figured that the Allied forces would be cut in half and would be unable to really coordinate to defeat Germany.  At that point, Hitler thought that he would be able to negotiate some sort of peace settlement.

Once the Germans lost this battle, their last hope was gone and they were sure to have to surrender unconditionally.

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