What was Romeo's view of love in Act 1, scene 1-3 of Romeo and Juliet?

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Romeo Montague begins Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet already completely smitten . . . but with a woman who is not Juliet! In act I, scene i, Benvolio and the audience both learn that Romeo is pining over a woman named Rosaline, who will not accept his advances, as she has sworn to "live chaste" (i.e., never have sex). Romeo is lovesick and heartbroken and refuses to let Benvolio "teach him to forget," as he believes it will be impossible for him to move on. It is clear from their exchange that Romeo is a romantic, in that when he loves he gives himself over to it completely, but his position on love at the start of the play is a negative one, as so far in his life all love has done is hurt him.

In scene ii, Romeo and Benvolio intercept an invitation to the Capulet's ball. Benvolio thinks this will be a great opportunity for Romeo to find someone else, but Romeo disagrees and says he will only go because he knows Rosaline will be there, still singing his same tune from scene i.

Scene iii...

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