What was the result in the play of Romans rejecting monarchy?shakespeare is considered a monarchist. that is, one who favors the rule of a single, all-powered leader.how is this opionon supported...

What was the result in the play of Romans rejecting monarchy?

shakespeare is considered a monarchist. that is, one who favors the rule of a single, all-powered leader.how is this opionon supported in the play? consider what rome was with a monarch rather than a republic.

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readerofbooks eNotes educator| Certified Educator

This is a sophisticated question. Well done. As you suggest, there are two contexts. The first context is the Roman world. The very fact that there was a conspiracy suggests that the Romans had reservations about any sort of monarchy. In fact, the Roman constitution was created to protect the Romans against monarchy. The second context is the social world of Shakespeare, where there was a monarch in place. So, by examining Shakespeare's play, Julius Caesar, you can gain a sense of where he stands on the issues of monarchy. I think one clue is that this play is considered one of Shakespeare's tragedies. To put it another way, Julius Caesar comes off pretty well, whereas the conspirators come off poorly. Shakespeare could have had it the other way very easily. The fact that he does not go this route, suggest that Shakespeare was a monarchist.

Doug Stuva eNotes educator| Certified Educator

Concerning Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, if indeed Shakespeare is a monarchist, as you say, the play might demonstrate this in that the conspirators who assassinate Caesar (possibly the would-be emperor) are defeated and killed, or commit suicide. 

With the exception of Brutus, the conspirators are portrayed in the play as envious and jealous of Caesar.  Cassius, in particular, is portrayed as unlikeable.  Only Brutus is portrayed as noble and as interested in serving Rome rather than himself. 

The negative portrayal of the conspirators, then, as well as the fact that the conspirators are defeated and cleansed from the Roman world in the fashion of tragedy, could be used as evidence that Shakespeare favored monarchy in the play.

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Julius Caesar

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