The New England Colonies

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What was the New England colonies' relationship with the natives?

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The relationship between indigenous people of the land now typically known as "New England" was certainly one of colonizers taking land and displacing natives, and of the colonized being displaced with some attempting to fight back. The colonists quickly began attacking native tribes and forcing them off their ancestral lands. As European diseases and European weaponry began devastating the indigenous population, more and more land was stolen from indigenous tribes as their numbers significantly dwindled. European missionaries attempted to coerce indigenous tribes into Christianity under threat of violence and slavery. In the mid 1600s, indigenous folks of the Pequot tribe launched an uprising against the colonists of so-called "Connecticut" in what became known as the Pequot Wars. While many tribes fought bravely and fiercely to push the colonists back and away from their lands, the colonists had too many resources, as they had the entire backing of the British crown behind them.

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