What was meant by the term, "Second New Deal?"  

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The New Deal was a program of economic reform put forth by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. From 1933 to 1939, changes were made in agriculture and resource distribution, housing, and labor conditions. The New Deal was intended to remedy the effects of the Great Depression and focused on aid for...

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The New Deal was a program of economic reform put forth by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. From 1933 to 1939, changes were made in agriculture and resource distribution, housing, and labor conditions. The New Deal was intended to remedy the effects of the Great Depression and focused on aid for the poor, the elderly, and the unemployed. Perhaps the most famous change resulting from the New Deal was the establishment of the Social Security program, which ensures a financial safety net for people who cannot work or otherwise afford their needs.

Most historians use the term, "Second New Deal" to refer to the second part of Roosevelt's reforms. Between 1935 and 1938, Roosevelt promoted labor unions to improve working conditions, signed off on the Social Security Act, and created the United States Housing Authority. While the first part of the New Deal had more to do with "big-picture" economic crises like the stock market crash, the Second New Deal sought to reform troubles experienced on a more day-to-day basis, like poverty.

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