What was the important of the declaration of the right of man?

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What's the most important part of the Declaration of the Rights of Man? You could argue about this forever, because the articles are supposed to be an all-or-nothing proposition. The Declaration is a statement of the minimum necessary for a functioning free society. Asking which is the most important is...

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What's the most important part of the Declaration of the Rights of Man? You could argue about this forever, because the articles are supposed to be an all-or-nothing proposition. The Declaration is a statement of the minimum necessary for a functioning free society. Asking which is the most important is like asking which of your internal organs is the most important. You can survive without some of them, but a strong healthy body needs them all. Here's what I think:

There are twenty-seven articles in the Declaration. Twenty-five of them are basically guidelines for the kinds of laws the revolutionaries of late eighteenth-century France thought would be good for the country. Only two of them, the first and the fourth, are statements of principle or articles of faith, you might call them. Of those two, I think Article Four is more important.

It's self-evident that we're all born free. People only acquire "worth" as they get older. Think about it. Even the most unrepentant racist was born unaware of any distinctions between himself and others. Another way of putting that is, we're all born equal. We're born equal and we acquire prejudice, or become the victims of oppression, as we grow up. So, Article One is important, but when I read it, I think, okay now what?

Article Four is the beginning of the answer to that question. It's an assertion of what's called "negative liberty," which is actually a good thing. If you believe, and have enshrined in your basic law, that liberty consists of doing anything which doesn't harm others, you are already the perfect citizen. Everything else, from finding the limits of "which doesn't harm others" to actually doing whatever you want, is a matter for the rest of the Declaration. It all begins with that concept of liberty, which frames everything else.

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The Declaration of the Rights of Man represents a fundamental step in the advancement of human rights and is one of the most important documents of the French Revolution. It was issued by the National Constituent Assembly on August 26, 1789 and was inspired by the ideas of the French Revolution, naturalism, and philosophers of the Enlightenment (for example, Rousseau).

In the declaration we find a list of rights we take for granted today but which weren't actually automatically recognized in 1789. The are the fundamental rights on which many modern constitutions are based. They are natural rights, rights which all men have because they are human, valid in all places and times. They cannot be alienated. These rights are, for example, the right to life, property, freedom of speech, freedom of religion, and more. According to the declaration, all men are born free and equal.

The declaration is one of the highest recognitions of human dignity and freedom; without it, we would not have the constitutions we have today all over the world.

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