What was the epiphany in the story A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings?

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meanicecream | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

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The epiphany of the story we just learned, from our teacher (Dr. of English), is around the time in the story when the physician comes to listen to the boy and the winged man because they both have chicken pocks. The epiphany is when someone has a realization (preferably the protagonist, but sometimes by the antagonist). The Dr. comes and listens to the winged man, listens to all the noises from within, only to assume that the winged man should be dead due to too much activity going on. The epiphany is when the Dr. realizes that we, us humans, do not have wings yet this old birdman does. The Dr. represents the antagonist group, humanity, where as the birdman represents religion and how we tend to throw it in the corner of our lives and are unappreciative of it.

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mkcapen1 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Valedictorian

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The short story for children "A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings" leaves the reader at first puzzled by what had occurred.  There seems to be a force of ambiguity when it comes to the angel.  Angels are often pictured as young and beautiful with lovely wings.  The angel in the story is old ad his wings are ugly.  The reader has no idea if he does perform the miracle of the child's health improvement.

The angel is willing to do nothing and remains in the chicken coup.  The people identify him as a nuisance.  There is no gratitude towards the angel for the fortune that he has brought to them.

There are two epiphanies in the story.  One is that the child is safe around the angel.  The other is that having a supernatural being around gets annoying.

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