What was the effect of the Supreme Court case McCulloch v. Maryland?

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The 1819 Supreme Court case of McCulloch v. Maryland had a few significant effects. Directly relating to the case, it established the precedent that it was within the power of Congress to incorporate a bank. Furthermore, a state could not levy taxes on an institution that is operating under the...

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The 1819 Supreme Court case of McCulloch v. Maryland had a few significant effects. Directly relating to the case, it established the precedent that it was within the power of Congress to incorporate a bank. Furthermore, a state could not levy taxes on an institution that is operating under the mandate of the federal government. Simply put, a state or local government cannot tax the national government, because the Supremacy Clause of the Constitution states that federal law is superior to state and local law.

Indirectly, this case had some more wide-ranging effects. It defined and expanded the role of the federal government. In Chief Justice Marshall's written opinion, he stated that Congress has the right to "make all laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into execution the foregoing powers." In other words, the national bank was constitutional, because it was necessary for carrying out the duties of the national government.

This case helped better define federalism in the United States. As a result of the court's decision, it was clear that the federal government could create institutions and make laws that were not explicitly laid out in the Constitution as long as they helped the government carry out its powers as enumerated by the Constitution.

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