What was education like in England in the 1920s?

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Education in England during the 1920s moved forward in the post-war era. The passage of Education Act, 1921 raised the earliest age at which a student could discontinue school to 14. Its purpose was to revise and consolidate all the prior education laws and acts.

Local Education Authorities (LEAs) were...

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Education in England during the 1920s moved forward in the post-war era. The passage of Education Act, 1921 raised the earliest age at which a student could discontinue school to 14. Its purpose was to revise and consolidate all the prior education laws and acts.

Local Education Authorities (LEAs) were formed. These local authorities monitored the needs of schools, from nursery schools to those serving students older than 14. LEAs set the regulations and rules for the students who attended the local public schools and their parents.

State school education was free for children starting at the age of five. Even primary school children were required to attend a full day of school. Although the theories of experts such as Marie Montessori were gaining popularity, basic teaching practices involved rote learning and instruction of trades needed in the diverse locales where the schools were located.

In addition, Education Act, 1921 attempted to provide education for students with disabilities, but placed the onus on parents to insure the children came to school. Even if their children were not disabled, parents were still responsible for their children's attendance.

In essence, education during twentieth century in England set many of the standards for the educational practices currently in place for public education.  

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