What was the attitude of the British and French royalty towards their respective countries?

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In A Tale of Two Cities , the French royals are unconcerned with the state of the common folk. These royals hold lavish receptions in the hotels of Paris as their servants bring them food and drinks. One specific example of this is the Monseigneur in the section, “Monseigneur in...

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In A Tale of Two Cities, the French royals are unconcerned with the state of the common folk. These royals hold lavish receptions in the hotels of Paris as their servants bring them food and drinks. One specific example of this is the Monseigneur in the section, “Monseigneur in Town.” The attitude of the nobility is that they should be free to deal with their own problems: securing more power and money. They pay little attention to what’s happening in public and do not even attempt to try to make sense of the issues the lower classes have. The British aristocracy at the start of the book seem to feel that both Britain and France will continue to endure as they always have without any significant changes to the political status quo. It’s not until the wealthy French begin fleeing the country that the British begin to think that even countries as old as France, with its deeply rooted monarchy, could be threatened by a revolt.

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