What view does Cassie have of her "place" in the world in Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry?

Cassie sees her "place" in the world differently than others might in Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry. While she is a black girl in a racist society and others try to put her down, her parents' strong example and her own belief in her worthiness help her to maintain her confidence and pride.

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Cassie is an intelligent child with confidence and pride. This confidence stems from some differences Cassie and her family have from the other families in Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry . For example, in the beginning of the story, Cassie reflects upon the land owned by her family. Land...

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Cassie is an intelligent child with confidence and pride. This confidence stems from some differences Cassie and her family have from the other families in Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry. For example, in the beginning of the story, Cassie reflects upon the land owned by her family. Land ownership by black families is rare at this time, and Papa wants her to realize the importance of the land. When Cassie asks him why the land is so important to him, he tells her,

You ain't never had to live on nobody's place but your own and long as I live and the family survives, you'll never have to.

Another difference is that Mama is seen as a "disrupting maverick" to some of the others. They see Mama as too prideful and radical in her ideas because Mama stands up for what she feels is right. Education is a priority for Mama, and she ensures that her children spend time studying.

These differences shape Cassie's views and opinions. Cassie once questions a store owner for choosing to help a white child over her. The man becomes angry and tells Stacey not to bring her back until her "mammy teach her what she is."

As the story progresses, Cassie must learn harsh lessons and truths about her place in society. While Mama and Papa want her to feel proud, they also want her to survive. Mama explains to her,

White people may demand our respect, but what we give them is not respect but fear.

It is through these experiences that Cassie views her place in society. She knows she has freedoms and rights that others would choose to deny her. Cassie learns that she must choose carefully in how to respond to the racist ideals of others.

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