In Aldous Huxley's Brave New World, what does John the Savage mean when he says, "O brave new world who has such people in it"? Quotes would be useful, as well as any analysis. 

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John the Savage says "O brave new world" at three different points in the novel, and each time the words have a different meaning. The phrase comes from Shakespeare's The Tempest, in which Miranda, who has grown up since babyhood on a deserted island, makes the exclamation "How beauteous mankind is! O Brave new world . . ." when she sees multiple young men from the shipwrecked vessel for the first time.

When John first quotes this phrase from The Tempest, he is speaking sincerely. He is on the Savage Reservation and is thrilled to be going to the World State, which his mother Linda has described to him for many years as a utopia. He also is in love with Lenina, so—as with Miranda—the phrase has sexual overtones. There's also humor and irony, however, in John thinking in the midst of all this of Lenina:

"How many goodly creatures are there here! How beauteous mankind is!" The flush suddenly deepened; he was thinking of Lenina, of an angel in bottle-green viscose, lustrous with youth and...

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