What types of mood and atmosphere are found in the book Frankenstein?

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The mood of Frankenstein is quite ominous and mysterious.  When Walton and his crew find Victor , frozen and starving on the ice, he only has one sled dog still alive, and the captain describes his eyes as possessing a kind of "wildness" and "madness."  This contrasts with Victor's moments...

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The mood of Frankenstein is quite ominous and mysterious.  When Walton and his crew find Victor, frozen and starving on the ice, he only has one sled dog still alive, and the captain describes his eyes as possessing a kind of "wildness" and "madness."  This contrasts with Victor's moments of "benevolence and sweetness," though he remains "melancholy and despairing" even in these moments.  What can have happened to this person to create such dissimilar attributes?  His condition cannot be the result of something happy or joyful, and thus the mystery begins: we expect something terrible.

Further, in one of their earliest conversations, Victor tells Walton, 

"You seek for knowledge and wisdom, as I once did; and I ardently hope that the gratification of your wishes may not be a serpent to sting you, as mine has been."

At this point, then, we know that Victor's story is going to be one that contains some tragedy and, likely, some guilt.  He seems to acknowledge the role he has played in getting himself into his current position: he realizes he is here because he sought one thing above all else.  We know this story cannot end well, based on Walton's observations of Victor.  Finally, we also know that Walton also has a terrible thirst for knowledge, and this presents the strong possibility that he could end up in as tragic a position as Victor.  All of this contributes to the ominous and mysterious mood.  

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I would say the primary mood/ atmosphere in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein is one of foreboding or dread. Consider, for instance, that we get most of Frankenstein's story after the events of the tale have occurred; in other words, Frankenstein is telling us his story retrospectively, allowing him to reflect on his story as he tells it. Thus, it's easy for him to infuse his tale with a strong feeling of dread and ominous foreboding, as he already knows what happens. Moreover, it's clear from the start that Frankenstein's experiments are a bad idea and will only result in something evil, and the monster's stalking of Frankenstein and those closest to him builds a sense of dread. All in all, the story has a mood of building terror, and we get the sense that we as readers are also being haunted by some monstrosity. That said, it's hard not to sympathize with the monster once we meet him. As such, the mood also involves a sense of melancholy, or even tragedy.

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