What are three different types of love in Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream?

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Mature love: Hippolyta and Theseus are mature adults. They are marrying because Hippolyta is part of the conquests of war, but the two seem genuinely fond of and attracted to one another. Though eager for the sexual consummation of their marriage, Theseus does not lose his head over Hippolyta, nor...

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Mature love: Hippolyta and Theseus are mature adults. They are marrying because Hippolyta is part of the conquests of war, but the two seem genuinely fond of and attracted to one another. Though eager for the sexual consummation of their marriage, Theseus does not lose his head over Hippolyta, nor she him.

Infatuation: Infatuation is presented as the height of foolishness. When the characters are enchanted by the magic love flower's juices, they act like buffoons to woo the object of their desires, no matter how homely they are (see: Titania's love for Bottom, who literally has an ass's head). Infatuated characters lose all reason and project noble attributes onto the beloved that are not really there.

Young love: Young love, as shown through the four lovers, is shown to be passionate and even reckless. Hermia and Lysander are willing to throw away their place in Athens and disobey the State to be together. Helena is willing to betray her best friend in the hopes of pleasing Demetrius, the man she loves, who does not return her feelings.

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There are many different types of love represented in Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream, and certainly more than three. However, in this answer, I'll focus on the types of love that I find to be most prominent/important in the play: romantic love, unrequited love, and forced/fake love.

Romantic Love: This type of love is pretty straightforward, as it's the kind of love that occurs between people who really, genuinely, deeply care for each other. There are multiple examples of romantic love in the play, as it can be found pretty generally in most of the play's natural couples. Lysander and Hermia, Theseus and Hippolyta, and even Oberon and Titania all experience romantic love within their relationships (although, it's worth noting, this latter couple has a pretty weird way of expressing it at times). Essentially, all of these couples genuinely care and love one another in a romantic fashion.

Unrequited Love: There are less examples of unrequited love, but it's still important. At the beginning of the play, Helena has unrequited love for Demetrius, as she loves him dearly but is repeatedly scorned by him. As such, her love is not returned by the object of her affections. However, Demetrius ultimately does return Helena's affections by the end of the play, but that doesn't diminish the importance of her original, lonely expressions of love.

Forced/Fake LoveThis kind of love is obviously artificial, and it serves as one of the play's primary comedic devices. Lysander, Demetrius, and Titania are all given a potion that causes them to falsely love the first thing they see upon waking. As you can imagine, this causes quite a lot of confusion and hilarity, as it motivates Lysander and Demetrius to fight over Helena, and also makes Titania dote upon the bumbling Bottom. However, while funny, the forced/fake love motif has sinister undertones. Forcing one person to love another is potentially traumatic and, though it's funny within the play, it certainly wouldn't be very funny in real life. As such, though forced/fake love makes us laugh while watching the play, it should also cause us to think more critically about the boundaries in relationships that cannot be crossed. 

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