What types of figurative language are in the passage from the end of chapter 23 from "No, everybody's gotta learn, nobody's born knowin'" to the end of the chapter.I'm writing a literary analysis...

What types of figurative language are in the passage from the end of chapter 23 from "No, everybody's gotta learn, nobody's born knowin'" to the end of the chapter.

I'm writing a literary analysis essay and am not sure what figurative language is in this passage.

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shake99 | Teacher | (Level 3) Senior Educator

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In this passage in the book To Kill a Mockingbird, Jem and Scout are trying to understand what makes people different from each other. They have learned a lot over the course of the novel. Jem has just told Scout that he thinks there are four kinds of people in the world, and he goes on to explain what those kinds are. He believes that educational background has a lot to do with what people are like (he doesn’t say it that way of course). Scout disagrees and speaks the line in your question:

No, everybody’s gotta learn, nobody’s born knowin.’

The figurative language comes in the next paragraph:

Jem turned around and punched his pillow. When he settled back his face was cloudy . . . his mouth became a thin line.

The writer uses figurative language to describe Jem’s appearance. By writing that his “face was cloudy” and his mouth looked like a “thin line” the writer shows us that he is deep in thought, trying hard to understand people  and what makes them different from one another. The specific type of figurative language used here is the metaphor.

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