The Tell-Tale Heart by Edgar Allan Poe

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What types of conflict are involved in Edgar Allan Poe's short story, "The Tell-Tale Heart"?  

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D. Reynolds eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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Poe shows the conflict between the narrator's concept of reality and reality itself. He also creates a conflict between the reader and the narrator. 

The narrator wants to establish his sanity, which suggests that he has been accused of insanity. As he tells his story, however, it becomes increasingly obvious that he is living in his own reality, one separate from that of other people. He probably is insane. For example, he feels he has to murder the old man because the man has an "Evil Eye." He also wants to silence the man's heartbeat, which he believes he can hear. Later, the narrator...

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fireman123 | Student

The types of conflict that are present in Edgar Allan Poe's short story, "The Tell-Tale Heart" are person vs. self and person vs. person. The protagonist, a care taker of an old man is annoyed and dsitrubed by the eye of the old man. He claims that the eye is possessed by evil, calling it the "Evil Eye". He leads out a plan to go and kill the man. The person vs. self, is the protagonist vs. himself. His own conscious is the sound of the heartbeat. He is hearing the guiltiness.

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