What type of structure is in the scene where Julia and Winston go to O'Briens home?out of these 3 which is it and why: dramatic: sequence of events building up to a powerful conclusion logical:...

What type of structure is in the scene where Julia and Winston go to O'Briens home?

out of these 3 which is it and why:

dramatic: sequence of events building up to a powerful conclusion

logical: sequence of ideas connected by addition, result, comparison,contrast, passage of time, enumeration, etc.

Problem-solution: question-answer/cause-effect/thesis-antithesis-synthesis/method-result-conclusion

 

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mstultz72 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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I believe Chapter 16 is a dramatic chapter.  It has all the hallmarks of dramatic literature (irony, metaphor, symbolism), and it builds to a powerful conclusion, although the resolution is unclear.

The chapter might stand alone as short dramatic one-act.  It begins with a description of setting and has powerful dialogue, the most important of which is the exchange between O'Brien (Satanic figure) and Winston and Julia (Adam and Eve).  They are effectively selling their souls to the Devil here:

’You are prepared to give your lives?’ ’Yes.’ ’You are prepared to commit murder?’ ’Yes.’

’To commit acts of sabotage which may cause the death of hundreds of innocent people?’  ’Yes.’

’To betray your country to foreign powers?’ ’Yes.’ ’You are prepared to cheat, to forge, to blackmail, to corrupt the minds of children, to distribute habit-forming drugs, to encourage prostitution, to dissem- 101inate venereal diseases — to do anything which is likely to cause demoralization and weaken the power of the Party?’  ’Yes.’

’If, for example, it would somehow serve our interests to throw sulphuric acid in a child’s face — are you prepared to do that?’  ’Yes.’

’You are prepared to lose your identity and live out the rest of your life as a waiter or a dock-worker?’  ’Yes.’

’You are prepared to commit suicide, if and when we order you to do so?’ ’Yes.’ ’You are prepared, the two of you, to separate and never see one another again?’

’No!’ broke in Julia.

This dialogue reads like unholy marriage vows; instead of "I do," the couple answers "Yes" to each of the terrorist crimes that O'Brien proposes.

The scene is filled with verbal irony, as O'Brien is clearly setting them up.  He really hooks Winston, more so than Julia, and Winston's naivete foreshadows his unperson status by the novel's end.  So says Enotes editor:

Although the litany of crimes that Winston is all-too-willing to commit reinforces the hopelessness of his existence, O’Brien’s method of interrogation is hypnotic. Note that it is Julia who interjects that she is not willing to accept a permanent separation from Winston, raising the question of what Winston’s response would have been.

O’Brien’s explanation of the Brotherhood is equally mysterious, for he tells Winston he will “always be in the dark.” The circumstances of Winston’s life seem bleak indeed, as O’Brien points out that change will not occur during his lifetime, and Winston’s actions are certain to end in arrest, torture, and death. The statement “We are the dead” is both cryptic and prophetic.

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