What type of poem is Auden's "Funeral Blues"?  What are the indicators of the poem (is it lyrical or narrative)?  What sound or musical devices does the poem use?  

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The poem is an elegy , but I agree that the poem has a satiric (or at least ironic) element to it. The rhyme scheme supports this view; the poem consists of eight rhymed couplets, and this pattern gives the poem a kind of pat regularity that can be understood...

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The poem is an elegy, but I agree that the poem has a satiric (or at least ironic) element to it. The rhyme scheme supports this view; the poem consists of eight rhymed couplets, and this pattern gives the poem a kind of pat regularity that can be understood as undermining the seriousness of purpose normally associated with an elegy. The rhyming also emphasizes the hyperbolic nature of the poet’s reaction to the death of this unnamed person—sometimes this is quite funny (“Let aeroplanes circle moaning overhead / Scribbling on the sky the message ‘He is Dead’”) and sometimes delivers an unexpected punch (“My noon, my midnight, my talk, my song / I thought love would last forever. I was wrong”). The final two lines of the poem sum up Auden’s ambivalent relationship to the subject of the poem (“Pour away the ocean and sweep up the wood; / For nothing now can ever come to any good”)—on the one hand, it’s clear that this is meant to be seen as an overreaction, but on the other, it can be read as a realization of the finality of death.

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Auden actually wrote "Funeral Blues"—or at least, the more widely-known second edition, from 1938—to be sung to music. As such, it is most certainly a lyrical poem, not least because it is actually the lyrics to a piece of musical accompaniment by British composer Benjamin Britten. Accordingly, the elegy is written in quatrains, or "verses," and in rhyming couplets—both features suited to song.

Apart from the rhyme scheme, there are various other sound devices used in this poem to create internal cohesion. For example, Auden uses alliteration on a number of occasions ("working week," "nothing now," "love would last"). He also incorporates words which allude to external sounds, such as "clocks," "telephone," "barking," "pianos," and "muffled drum." When the piece is performed, these words offer cues as to what sound devices should accompany the lyrics—the poem can be introduced, for example, with the regular ticking of a clock which cuts out abruptly on the word "stop." Likewise, the phrase "muffled drum" has a rhythm and dull sound (emphasized by the assonance on "u") which can easily go alongside, and replicate, the muffled drumming it describes.

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The poem is an elegy, as explained by the other commenter, and it is also an example of a lyric poem; lyrical poetry focuses on the emotions and has a rhyme scheme, and "Funeral Blues" clearly focuses on the speaker's emotions over the loss of a loved one and does possess an end-rhyme scheme. 

The use of the word "moaning" in line 5 is an example of onomatopoeia.  The sound of the word moan imitates the sound it describes: the droning of the planes flying overhead.  It also personifies them (as "moaning" is the sound a human makes when he is sad or mournful, as they narrator is).  The repetition of the short "o" (as it cot or lot) sound in the first phrase, "Stop all the clocks," is an example of assonance.  The repetition of the word "my" in the third stanza emphasizes just how much the speaker feels he has lost when his loved one passed away.  The repetition of the initial "p" sound in the final stanza -- in the words "put," "Pack," and "Pour" -- is an example of alliteration

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"Funeral Blues" is an elegy, a poem written about someone who has died. The rhyme scheme is aabbccddeeffgghh, with each stanza containing two rhymed couplets.

The speaker is calling on the world to come to a stop and mourn the death of his/her lover. In the final stanza, the speaker calls on God or nature to put away the stars, the oceans, the woods, much as a housekeeper would put away unneeded items during a spring cleaning.

The poem verges on hyperbole, implying that the entire world would stop for the death of a single person (although that is certainly the way it feels to a mourner). This poem was originally written as a parody of an elegy to a fallen political leader.

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