What type of personality does Sylvia have in "A White Heron"? What in the story lets the reader know?

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Sylvia, whose name connotes the forest, as it resembles the word sylvan, is a child of Nature; she is uncomfortable in the world of people.

When her grandmother takes Sylvia from the crowded manufacturing town and the house crowded with children, Sylvia immediately feels comfortable in the country—"it seemed as...

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Sylvia, whose name connotes the forest, as it resembles the word sylvan, is a child of Nature; she is uncomfortable in the world of people.

When her grandmother takes Sylvia from the crowded manufacturing town and the house crowded with children, Sylvia immediately feels comfortable in the country—"it seemed as if she had never been alive at all before she came to live at the farm." For in the town Sylvia was "afraid of folks," as her grandmother has remarked. Even after Sylvia has moved away, on one evening the thought of the "great red-faced boy" who used to chase and frighten her hurries the timid girl along the path with her grandmother's cow as she herds the animal home from its grazing.

"Horror-stricken" by the whistle of a man, Sylvia feels that "the enemy" has discovered her when the handsome ornithologist approaches her on the path along which she brings home the cow. She does not dare to look directly at him. When he asks her name, she barely manages to say "Sylvy." Later, however, she is stirred romantically by this handsome young man: "the woman's heart, asleep in the child, was vaguely thrilled by a dream of love." And because of her attraction to this ornithologist, Sylvia considers helping him by finding the location of the white heron that he seeks. However, when she sees this great bird and learns his secret home in the green world which she so dearly loves, the girl cannot betray the heron.

The murmur of the pine's green branches is in her ears, she remembers how the white heron came flying through the golden air and how they watched the sea and the morning together, and Sylvia cannot speak; she cannot tell the heron's secret and give its life away.

Sylvia cannot sacrifice her beloved poetry of nature for the temporal "wave of human interest" that has recently stirred her.

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Sylvia feels especially alive in the natural setting and could never seem to thrive and grow when she lived in the city.  Listening to thrushes near her grandmother's farm, her "heart [...] beat fast with pleasure."  She is incredibly comfortable in the company of animals, and even more uncomfortable with people.  When she first hears the hunter's whistle, she is "horror-stricken" and associates the sound with an "enemy," an impression that makes it clear just how intuitive and accurate she is (the hunter is very much the enemy of the creatures to whom she feels such a kinship). 

The comparison of her to several different natural creatures alerts us to her fragility as well as her strength.  When the hunter starts to follow her home, "she hung her head as if the stem of it were broken"; here, she is compared to a broken flower, its stem snapped.  However, climbing the big pine tree, her "bare feet and fingers [...] pinched and held like bird's claws"; in this scene, she is compared to a bird, another creature that, perhaps, seems fragile but can really be quite strong and tough and resilient.  In the end, Sylvia is extremely loyal to the nature she loves so much, and she refuses to give the heron's secret away. 

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