What type of relationship do Atticus and Scout have in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird?

In To Kill a Mockingbird, Atticus and Scout share a close, but unconventional father-daughter relationship. Atticus respects Scout's tomboy nature and her need to be herself, while Scout looks up to her father and trusts his advice.

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To put it simply, Atticus and Scout share a fantastic father-daughter relationship, to a degree that was perhaps unusual in the 1930s. The first example of this is in the names that they call each other. Atticus, who has been widowed and is very busy with his job as a lawyer, does not insist on addressing his tomboyish daughter by the name she was given at birth—Jean-Louise—but instead calls her Scout. Over and above this, Atticus allows Scout to dress like a tomboy and does not expect her to behave as a girl typically would. Scout addresses her father by his first name, which would generally never have been acceptable behavior at this time.

Atticus shows that he cares deeply about Scout by taking the time to read the newspaper with her every evening—and in doing so, manages to gently remind his daughter about the importance of her education, without making her feel pressured or as though she has been bossed around. He adds further to her education by fostering the type of...

(The entire section contains 4 answers and 836 words.)

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